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Time-space, disciplines, margins
Author: Saurabh Dube

This book explores modernity, the disciplines, and their interplay by drawing in critical considerations of time, space, and their enmeshments. Based in anthropology and history, and drawing on social-political theory (as well as other, complementary, critical perspectives), it focuses on socio-spatial/disciplinary subjects and hierarchical-coeval tousled temporalities. The spatial/temporal templates reveal how modern enticements and antinomies, far from being analytical abstractions, intimate instead ontological attributes and experiential dimensions of the worlds in which we live, and the spaces and times that we inhabit and articulate. Then, the book considers the oppositions and enchantments, the contradictions and contentions, and the identities and ambivalences spawned under modernity. At the same time, rather than approach such antinomies, enticements, and ambiguities as analytical errors or historical lacks, which await their correction or overcoming, it attempts to critically yet cautiously unfold these elements as constitutive of modern worlds. The book draws on social theory, political philosophy, and other scholarship in the critical humanities in order to make its claims concerning the mutual binds between everyday oppositions, routine enchantments, temporal ruptures, and spatial hierarchies of a modern provenance. Then, it turns to issues of identity and modernity. Finally, the book explores the terms of modernism on the Indian subcontinent.

Open Access (free)
Time and space
Saurabh Dube

This chapter is cast as a personal narrative. It unravels how I arrived at inklings and understandings of space and time – alongside those of disciplines and subjects, modernity and identity – that were explored in the Introduction and which lie at the core of this book. At stake are intimations that are at once familiar and strange. For, born to anthropologist parents, I

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Entanglements and ambiguities
Saurabh Dube

This chapter discusses aspects of the interplay between the disciplines and modernity, as mediated by temporal-spatial imperatives. It focuses on the relationship between anthropology and history in order to discuss formations of modern knowledge as themselves forming critical subjects and crucial procedures of modernity. On the one hand, I explore the mutual interchange of time

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Identities and incitements
Saurabh Dube

This chapter focuses on questions and contentions of identity and modernity, entailing stipulations of time and space. Instead of approaching identity as an already given entity that is principally antithetical to modernity, in speaking of identities my reference is to wide-ranging processes of formations of subjects, expressing not only particular personhoods but also collective

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Antinomies and enticements
Saurabh Dube

This chapter considers aspects of the interplay of modernity and history, as entailing pervasive procedures of the temporalization of space and the spatialization of time. We have seen that these protocols have twin dimensions: on the one hand, they entail routine projections of historical time as necessarily homogeneous and yet founded on inaugural spatial ruptures; on the other

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
An introduction
Saurabh Dube

This book explores modernity, the disciplines, and their interplay by drawing in critical considerations of time, space, and their enmeshments. Based in anthropology and history, and drawing on social-political theory (as well as other, complementary, critical perspectives), it focuses on socio-spatial/disciplinary subjects and hierarchical-coeval tousled temporalities. My

in Subjects of modernity
The mutual paranoia of Jacques Derrida and Niklas Luhmann
Gunther Teubner

implied in taking scarce goods, but that of the impossibility of the pure gift. The gift relation is the exact opposite of the economic exchange relation, but at the same time it is the gift which first sets off the circular movement of the economy. The founding paradox of the economy reveals itself in the moment when the relation of the pure gift, which exists before any reference to subjectivity

in Critical theory and legal autopoiesis
Authenticity
Steven Earnshaw

consider his mortality, and in a novel that moves forward at the same time as it repeatedly returns to key life events, we learn in great detail about a self-​hating narrator who also happens to pretty much hate everybody else most of the time. His most recent job is as an English teacher, so he knows his literature –​the novel is awash with literary references6 –​and he is fully aware of how the dominant social and psychoanalytical world of 1950s America views a loser such as he is, since he finds himself on more than one occasion in a mental asylum being subject to

in The Existential drinker
Abstract only
Allyn Fives

chapter will defend a value pluralist perspective on political obligation generally and the obligation to obey the law specifically, and in doing so build on the value pluralist arguments of Shklar's own early work. In her second book, Shklar considers crimes to be public wrongs, subject to public investigation and punishment (Shklar 1964a , pp. 36–7). At this time she also conceptualises crime without claiming to have identified the general rule for resolving moral conflicts, and, in addition, she does not employ the exile/ordinary crime dichotomy. Admittedly, her

in Judith Shklar and the liberalism of fear
Truth
Steven Earnshaw

65 2 Jack London, John Barleycorn (1913): truth John Barleycorn must have his due. He does tell the truth. That is the curse of it. John Barleycorn (1913) is Jack London’s account of his life from youth up to the time of writing the book, held together thematically by the author’s love-​hate relationship with ‘John Barleycorn’, a traditional personification of drink. The memoir has a conversational style which earns the trust of the reader, and in regaling its audience with the life of Jack London we see the concerns with poverty, gender, authorship

in The Existential drinker