Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 273 items for :

  • Manchester Medieval Sources x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
C. E. Beneš

Here follows part five , which addresses the three different states in which the city of Genoa has existed according to the vagaries of time. This part has three chapters: the first discusses the city’s nature and size (qualis et quanta) at the time of its founding; the second discusses its nature and size

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

worshipped Venus; the area of Italy around Rome worshipped Saturn; and another part of Italy worshipped Mercury. 10 Many peoples also worshipped the elements. In fact, the first person to worship the elements was Nimrod, who worshipped fire and forced others to worship it as well. It is said in the Scholastic history that this Nimrod lived until the time of Abraham, and when Abraham refused to worship fire Nimrod threw

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Editor: E.A. Jones

This source book offers a comprehensive treatment of the solitary religious lives in England in the late Middle Ages. It covers both enclosed anchorites or recluses and freely-wandering hermits, and explores the relation between them. The sources selected for the volume are designed to complement better-known works connected with the solitary lives, such as the anchoritic guide Ancrene Wisse, or St Aelred of Rievaulx’s rule for his sister; or late medieval mystical authors including the hermit Richard Rolle or the anchorite Julian of Norwich. They illustrate the range of solitary lives that were possible in late medieval England, practical considerations around questions of material support, prescribed ideals of behaviour, and spiritual aspiration. It also covers the mechanisms and structures that were put in place by both civil and religious authorities to administer and regulate the vocations. Coverage extends into the Reformation period to include evidence for the fate of solitaries during the dissolutions and their aftermath. The material selected includes visual sources, such as manuscript illustrations, architectural plans and photographs of standing remains, as well as excerpts from texts. Most of the latter are translated here for the first time, and a significant proportion are taken from previously unpublished sources.

Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

fruits will persist in heaven, as the Lord says: Do not work for food that perishes but for that which endures in eternal life . 2 It is therefore fitting to take refuge occasionally in the tranquillity of the mind and to see with the mind's eye how sweet the Lord is . 3 Furthermore, from time to time it is useful to commit to writing certain

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

world says that Janus, first king of Italy, built our Janicula. 3 And it is also clear from authentic chronicles that the aforesaid Janus reigned in the time of Moses, namely at the time in which Moses held the leadership of God's people in the desert—although other chronicles say that this same Janus reigned at the time of Abraham. 4 It is also clear from all the authentic chronicles

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Here follows part ten , which deals with the spiritual governance of the city of Genoa. This part has two chapters: the first explains the time in which the city was awarded the honour of a bishopric , while the second explains the time in which it was raised to the dignity of an archbishopric. Chapter one: When

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Part eleven describes the dates , names , and orders of all the bishops who are recorded as having existed in the city of Genoa. This part has as many chapters [nineteen] as the names of the bishops who are included here. Regarding the time in which the city of Genoa first received a bishopric, we expressed our opinion

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Here follows part four , which describes the time in which the city of Genoa was converted to the faith of Christ. This part has three chapters: the first chapter explains how the entire world was enslaved to the cult of idolatry. The second chapter explains how Genoa was the first city , or one of the first cities in Italy , to be converted to the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Here follows part twelve , which contains the names , dates , and orders of all the archbishops who have presided in the city of Genoa up to our own time; this part has as many chapters [eight] as there are names of archbishops. Let us therefore lay out the names and dates of these archbishops in order. Chapter one: Regarding Siro, last bishop and first

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

direction, and the anchorhold attached to the Carthusian priory at Sheen (Surrey) had a garden added to it some time after its foundation in 1417. 6 The cells of Carthusian monks each had a small private garden, and the restored cell at Mount Grace Priory (N. Yorks.) gives an idea of what such a garden might have looked like. Such evidence for attention to an anchorite’s physical health and wellbeing provides a pleasant counter

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550