Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 670 items for :

  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
J.W.M. Hichberger

The Crimean war (1854-56) was a watershed in civil-military relations. In previous wars, events had been followed only at some considerable distance, with the majority of the population aware of hostilities only in so far as they meant increased taxation or higher prices. During the forty years since Waterloo communications had reached new levels of speed and efficiency. The

in Images of the army
W. J. Perry
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
T. H. Pear
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Alex Robertson and Colin Lees
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Michael Hughes
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
C. H. Herford
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
A. J P Taylor
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
W. H. Semple
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Caroline Turner and Jen Webb

War, violence and divided societies Introduction War, violence and conflict necessarily provide the most extreme occasions for violations of human rights. The world wars of the twentieth century were the most destructive of human life and, in the case of the second world war, of human property, in recorded history. In Asia, the end of that war is also associated with struggles to achieve independence after what had been, in some cases, several centuries of colonial control. Though in most cases this was achieved fairly rapidly, that was not the end of the

in Art and human rights