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Jonathan R. Lyon
and
Lisa Wolverton

to his rule by a warlike fate. 7 Finally, old age and frequent battles weakened Wolf. He had earned so much goodwill from the common people, on account of his good fortune, that they thought prosperity could not follow them, either in war or in any other danger, except with him present (even doing nothing). Accordingly, they believed that, with him present, they were always about to attain victory

in Noble Society
Abstract only
Alison I. Beach
,
Shannon M.T. Li
, and
Samuel S. Sutherland

of war to such a degree that because he was strong and very swift among men and distinguished in all military activity, Liutold was selected by King Henry IV to be among the twelve men whom he always kept with him as supporters and accomplices of his wicked deeds. Because of this, Liutold earned a privilege of liberty from this same king, both for himself and for all of his posterity. 3.4. In the early flower of youth, Theodoric indulged in enticements of the flesh to his heart’s desire. But when he was more mature, he restrained his spirit from this inclination

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
Jonathan R. Lyon

. 113 The text uses the terms Iulinenses and Chaminenses to refer to the inhabitants of these cities; I have chosen to translate these as ‘the inhabitants of Wolin’ and ‘the inhabitants of Kamień Pomorski’ to avoid unnecessarily complicated terminology. 114 Sallust, The War with Catiline

in Noble Society
Jonathan R. Lyon

well as a daughter, Demud. 11 Count Arnold was the father of Count Robert, a war-like man, who died as a pilgrim in the lands across the sea on the expedition of Emperor Frederick [I]. 12 [The other] Robert, Arnold’s brother, was the father of Count Waleram, whose sons are Henry and Robert, now counts; their mother was named Kunigunde. 13 Their [i.e., Arnold and Robert’s] sister, Demud, was married to Embricho, who was the

in Noble Society
John H. Arnold
and
Peter Biller

Part VI: Councils and Statutes Introduction to Part VI The wars of the Albigensian crusade (1208–29) were brought to an end by the Peace of Paris 1 in 1229, by which Raymond VII, Count of Toulouse (d. 1249), capitulated and swore to persecute heresy. He was allowed to keep for his lifetime a third of the lands his father had held. His daughter Jeanne was to marry one of the French king’s brothers – she married Alphonse of Poitiers in 1236 or 1237. They were to inherit on Raymond’s death, and if they died

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300
Abstract only
John H. Arnold
and
Peter Biller

Huguette the Waldensians ( Woodbridge, 2001 ), appendix, pp. 131–56 (interrogations from Fournier register of two women supporters of Waldensians) J . Shinners , ed., Medieval Popular Religion , 2nd edn ( Toronto, 2006 ) J . Shirley , ed., The Song of the Cathar Wars ( Aldershot, 1996 ) N. P . Tanner , Decrees of the Ecumenical Councils , 2 vols ( London and Georgetown, 1990 ), pp. 230–5 (4th Lateran Council), 282–3 (1st Council of Lyon, heresy of Frederick II), 380–3 (Vienne, reform of

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300
Janet Hamilton
,
Bernard Hamilton
, and
Yuri Stoyanov

to Tefrice to try to negotiate peace in 869–70, but he was only able to arrange the exchange of prisoners. The war continued; Chrysocheir was killed in action in 872, and his head was cut off and sent to the emperor as a trophy [9(a)] . But Tefrice remained independent until 878, when, having recently been damaged in an earthquake, it surrendered to the Byzantines. 78 The imperial

in Christian dualist heresies in the Byzantine world c. 650–c. 1450
John Edwards

-1579] the constellations began to war against us with a strong hand and an outstretched arm. In the month of Nisan [March-April 1579], at the request of Cardinal Alvise d’Este, my revered father of blessed memory was thrown into prison because of a debt of fifteen hundred scudi [silver coins of a similar value to ducats] that had already been repaid. He sat there for about six months, and even after

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600
Abstract only
Janet Hamilton
,
Bernard Hamilton
, and
Yuri Stoyanov

Otherwise known as Tibrice (see map). For the border wars of the period see [6] and our Introduction, pp. 19–22. 5 See the abjuration formula below [11(c)] , section 17. 6 Paul of Samosata (Bishop of Antioch c . 260

in Christian dualist heresies in the Byzantine world c. 650–c. 1450
Abstract only
John Edwards

[danger], given the weakness of our human nature and the devil’s cunning and suggestion, continually and at every opportunity warring against us, could happen, if the principal cause of all this is not removed, [means we have] to throw the said Jews out of our kingdoms. Because, when some grave and detestable crime is committed by members of some college and university, it is right that such a college

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600