Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 38 items for :

  • phenomenology x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
  • All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Chris Abel

and theory. It then moves to a more detailed look at the writings of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Michael Polanyi1 on the body as the nucleus or fulcrum of human experience. Though neither author wrote directly about architecture or urban form, their work has significant implications for understanding the way people relate to their environment.2 Of the two, Merleau-Ponty is the better-known author and a philosopher in the same school of thought as Martin Heidegger, both of whom in turn acknowledge Edmund Husserl3 as the intellectual father of phenomenology. Together

in The extended self
Abstract only
Chris Abel

chapter follows the new thinking and discoveries of leading researchers in the field, some of whom have been motivated by the belief that a full understanding of the self and consciousness will come about only from a broadening of the cognitive and neurosciences to encompass the phenomenology of human experience. From an exploration of current concepts of the self and embodied minds, the discussion then moves on to some of the more specific and important discoveries in the latter field, many of which lend empirical support to Merleau-Ponty and Polanyi’s speculations

in The extended self
Abstract only
Chris Abel

meaning of place-identity as interpreted from different viewpoints, including those of ordinary home-dwellers, academics, literary figures and architectural critics and theorists. The marked differences in the meanings attached to spaces and places by both inhabitants and observers lead in turn to a discussion of cultural relativism, as argued by prominent linguists and anthropologists. The early influence of Martin Heidegger’s phenomenology on the idea of place in architectural theory is also discussed, paving the way for an overview of related approaches by later

in The extended self
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

Der Blaue Reiter and its legacies
Author: Dorothy Price

This book presents new research on the histories and legacies of the German Expressionist group, Der Blaue Reiter, the founding force behind modernist abstraction. For the first time Der Blaue Reiter is subjected to a variety of novel inter-disciplinary perspectives, ranging from a philosophical enquiry into its language and visual perception, to analyses of its gender dynamics, its reception at different historical junctures throughout the twentieth century, and its legacies for post-colonial aesthetic practices. The volume offers a new perspective on familiar aspects of Expressionism and abstraction, taking seriously the inheritance of modernism for the twenty-first century in ways that will help to recalibrate the field of Expressionist studies for future scholarship. Der Blaue Reiter still matters, the contributors argue, because the legacies of abstraction are still being debated by artists, writers, philosophers and cultural theorists today.

This book analyses the use of the past and the production of heritage through architectural design in the developmental context of Iran. It is the first of its kind to utilize a multidisciplinary approach in probing the complex relationship between architecture, development, and heritage. It uses established theoretical concepts including notions of globalism, nostalgia, tradition, and authenticity to show that development is a major cause of historical transformations in places such as Iran and its effects must be seen in relation to global political and historical exchanges as well as local specificities. Iran is a pertinent example as it has endured radical cultural and political shifts in the past five decades. Scholars of heritage and architecture will find the cross-disciplinary aspects of the book useful. The premise of the book is that transposed into other contexts, development, as a globalizing project originating in the West, instigates renewed forms of historical consciousness and imaginations of the past. This is particularly evident in architecture where, through design processes, the past produces forms of architectural heritage. But such historic consciousness cannot be reduced to political ideology, while politics is always in the background. The book shows this through chapters focusing on theoretical context, international exchanges made in architectural congresses in the 1970s, housing as the vehicle for everyday heritage, and symbolic public architecture intended to reflect monumental time. The book is written in accessible language to benefit academic researchers and graduate students in the fields of heritage, architecture, and Iranian and Middle Eastern studies.

Abstract only
Chris Abel

themselves, but also among architectural theorists.6 However, regardless of the valuable insights phenomenology provides into human experience and the existential role of the human body, it remains intentionally focused on describing the world as directly experienced in the here and now – phenomenology in itself has little to offer that might explain how we got to be the way we are, or what there might have been in our past to influence present perceptions. Likewise, while evolutionary theory promises to fill those gaps, it too is hobbled in its own manner by neo

in The extended self
Abstract only
Chris Abel

concluding chapter, Gill also briefly covers the ‘linguistic phenomenology’ of J. L. Austin,38 finding further common threads in Austin’s thought defining a mutual position with the former group ‘between the over-confidence of modernism and the skepticism of deconstructive postmodernism.’39 Taking a similar line to Wittgenstein’s interactive theory of language use, Gill writes, Austin dismisses what he calls the ‘descriptive fallacy,’ by which language is presumed to offer only a passive and presumably objective description of the world, in favor of ‘performative

in The extended self
Abstract only
Wassily Kandinsky and Walter Benjamin on language and perception
Annie Bourneuf

instead of mentally intending the meaning of a word, one can, by looking at it repeatedly, focus on what he calls the ‘word-skeleton’.32 Peter Fenves is one of the few scholars who has investigated Benjamin’s idea of the ‘word-skeleton’ in depth. Fenves relates it to Benjamin’s engagement with Husserl’s phenomenology and sees the ‘word-skeleton’ as a ‘“frontal assault” on the concepts of phenomenology’.33 As Fenves explains, Husserl attempts in his Logical Investigations to disentangle expression from indication by examining, in Husserl’s words, ‘expression in the

in German Expressionism
Abstract only
Belonging
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

untangle some of its complex operations (the links – and blockages or ‘hesitations’ – between apprehension and action, between feeling and believing, appearing, saying and doing) that makes a creative aesthetics so valuable to the study of social life.’21 Drawing on literary theorist and poetry scholar Isobel Armstrong’s scholarship, which draws parallels among theories of affect in discourses of phenomenology, psychoanalysis and other fields, Bennett also argues that, ‘Art, like affect itself, inhabits an in-between space and is an agent of change.’22 By exploring

in Productive failure