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Clive L. Spash

contradictions of its ecological economic advocates and particularly criticise their failure to reject orthodox mainstream economics and instead present apologetic arguments for continued use of its methodology and methods. I next turn to the foundational positions that can create a positive alternative social ecological economics. Employing critical realism as an aid, I work through a series of philosophical presuppositions – reality

in Foundations of social ecological economics

The well-being of Europe’s citizens depends less on individual consumption and more on their social consumption of essential goods and services – from water and retail banking to schools and care homes – in what we call the foundational economy. Individual consumption depends on market income, while foundational consumption depends on social infrastructure and delivery systems of networks and branches, which are neither created nor renewed automatically, even as incomes increase. This historically created foundational economy has been wrecked in the last generation by privatisation, outsourcing, franchising and the widespread penetration of opportunistic and predatory business models. The distinctive, primary role of public policy should therefore be to secure the supply of basic services for all citizens (not a quantum of economic growth and jobs). Reconstructing the foundational has to start with a vision of citizenship that identifies foundational entitlements as the conditions for dignified human development, and likewise has to depend on treating the business enterprises central to the foundational economy as juridical persons with claims to entitlements but also with responsibilities and duties. If the aim is citizen well-being and flourishing for the many not the few, then European politics at regional, national and EU level needs to be refocused on foundational consumption and securing universal minimum access and quality. If/when government is unresponsive, the impetus for change has to come from engaging citizens locally and regionally in actions which break with the top down politics of ‘vote for us and we will do this for you’.

Clive L. Spash

concept is employed not because it is claimed to be “true”, but because it is “useful”’. Instead, Sayer argues in favour of critical realism. This is a meta-theory that builds from reflection on problems with empiricism and Humean event regularity, but also critiques relativist strong constructionism (ontological idealism). The form I will

in Foundations of social ecological economics
Orthodox versus heterodox economics
Clive L. Spash

(Gerber and Brincat 2021 ). In recent times Andreas Malm has applied Marxist material realism to understanding the role of fossil fuels in the development of capitalism (Malm 2016 ), criticised various perspectives on climate change (Malm 2020 ) and deconstructed Bruno Latour’s social constructionist concept of hybrid nature (Malm 2019 ). Malm’s ( 2021 ) call for direct action by environmentalists might appear

in Foundations of social ecological economics
Clive L. Spash

a distinct realist element to social ecological economics. As discussed in Chapter 6 , realism here involves relating to the structure of biophysical systems. This matches a critical realist depth ontology that accepts the embeddedness of human social and economic systems in biological, chemical and physical structures that humans neither create nor control, but within which they must work, that is, by understanding how

in Foundations of social ecological economics
Clive L. Spash

Keynesian theory is based upon realism interpreted as respecting facts, that is, naive objectivism. The preanalytic vision also diverges from the Post Keynesian concept of stylised facts, first introduced by Kaldor ( 1961 ), which are supposed to be empirically based reflections of an objective reality (i.e., derived from an analytical empiricist scientific process). However, there need be no inconsistency here, as far as

in Foundations of social ecological economics
Clive L. Spash

disciplines at a sufficient level to gain insight and understanding of the potential interconnections, differing perspectives and potential for synthesis or transformation of understanding. Under critical realism the methodology would emphasise the need to identify relevant strata relating to a specific research question or object of study. This would signify the necessary disciplinary knowledge required and other potentially

in Foundations of social ecological economics
Abstract only
Bill Dunn

recollection of his earlier beliefs (Davis 1994 ), and Keynes’s philosophical thinking changed. But there were continuities, and the intuitionist epistemology and the uncertain consequences of action would become recurring themes. Keynes adopts Moore’s views with qualifications and omissions but broadly follows his half-steps away from neo-Hegelian idealism and organic unity, and from pragmatism’s realism and individualism. Figure 2.1 attempts to summarise the relations, adding a parenthetical Marx and Hegel on grounds of plausibility Figure 2.1 Idealism and

in Keynes and Marx
Abstract only
The desire called libidinal economy
Amin Samman

lines outlined above, but throughout one encounters the notion of a lost moment to which we might return, a moment to repeat and renew the revolutionary potential of libidinal economy. Contemporary thought therefore revisits and replays many prior aspects of libidinal economy, including the signal moods attached to these. Mark Fisher’s bleak vision of ‘capitalist realism’ is perhaps the paradigmatic

in Clickbait capitalism
Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou
and
Max Haiven

In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, Mark Fisher’s theorisation of mental and emotional life under the disenchanted conditions of capitalist realism was deeply compelling for scholars. 1 His exploration of the chasm between, on the one hand, the relentless demand on individuals to become successful ‘risk-taking’ entrepreneurs of the self, and, on the other, the

in Clickbait capitalism