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Chloe Porter

‘ species ’ which ‘radiated out’ from objects ‘carried the likeness or “similitudes” of visible forms from object to eye’; the likeness was then ‘stamped’ on the memory by the ‘internal senses’. 28 Influenced by Neoplatonism and advances in psychology, early modern theorists of vision positioned the imagination as a creative faculty that mediates between the sensory

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

reaching unto it. (p. 85, line 44, p. 86, lines 1–8) By legitimising poetic practice while drawing attention to its subversive potential, Sidney suggests that through mimesis poetry paradoxically goes ‘beyond Nature’ by reproducing non-mimetic, creative representation. 78 Sidney expresses deference to God

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The ends of incompletion
Chloe Porter

. In other words, when the prologue to Henry V invites playgoers to ‘make up the difference’, this request may be made partly in recognition that that difference is unknown and unattainable. In the previous chapter, I suggested that Shakespeare depicted Hermione’s statue as ‘under construction’ as part of the evocation of divine ‘wholeness’ and perfection. This perfect, creative

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Rachel E. Hile

demonstrating his knowledge of and ability to adapt creatively the works of both classical and English authors.13 Certainly Hall’s creative allusions to Spenserian motifs and quotations function in this manner. Through these allusions, Hall shows that he 11 Rebhorn unpacks the significance of the word “scurrilitie” with reference to the Latin word scurra: “By speaking of ‘scurrilitie,’ Wilson both invokes the lower class clown of Rome, thus connecting his treatise to the classical past it imitates, and brings the scurra up to date by identifying him with the lower class

in Spenserian satire