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The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

the extreme edges of the frame; however, once Logue gains Bertie’s trust after his father’s death, now in a tightly framed shot connoting intimacy, the Prince confesses how the teasing he endured as a child was encouraged by his father, who declared: ‘I was afraid of my father and my children are damned sure going to be afraid of me.’ Bertie further reveals the painful memory of a sadistic nanny who pinched him

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Authorship, praxis, observation, ethnography
Paul Henley

the non-verbal, the material and the performative practices that are constitutive of social life as much as the verbal and intellectual; they will manifest an intimacy between subjects and film-maker that arises from their long-term relationship and mutual trust. While they will be ready to acknowledge the presence of the film-maker, to the extent that this is necessary or desirable, they will be aesthetically low-key, not in order to mimic supposedly objective scientific reportage, but so as not to mask the voices of the subjects or smother the sounds, rhythms and

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Indigenous media and the Video nas Aldeias project
Paul Henley

Imbé Gikegü , both films compare well with the work of most outside ethnographic film-makers. One major difference is that as the two brothers are filming their family and friends, a wonderful degree of intimacy with the subjects emanates from the films that no external film-maker could ever hope to match. In this particular case then, if an anthropologist wanted to know how the Kuikuro view the world, or at least the particular questions of how they view the relationship between the moon and menstruation, or between the

in Beyond observation
Paul Henley

-screen husband in coming to terms with her transgendered identity. It is difficult to imagine that the loving, supportive intimacy of their relationship could be captured on film unless, paradoxically, the characters were not merely ignoring the presence of the cameraperson, as they would be doing in a documentary, but rather were pretending that he was not there at all, as in this ethnofiction. Although Transfiction is manifestly a fiction, I would have no hesitation in classifying it as an ethnographic

in Beyond observation
Paul Henley

, Voyage au Congo proceeds via a series of vignettes of the cultural life of the peoples whom the film-makers meet as they travel through Central Africa, with, unusually for the period, a particular emphasis on the activities of women. It also includes a well-executed fictionalised sequence in the central part of the film which follows the courtship of a young Sara couple and the negotiation of bride-wealth payments. This sequence involves a sense of relaxed intimacy between film-makers and subjects that would not be achieved again in African

in Beyond observation