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The St Vincent and the Grenadines context
Philip Nanton

There is a longstanding debate among analysts of the Caribbean about the notion of ‘civilisation’ and its meaning for the region. In the Caribbean, civilisation, work and language have been linked, admittedly in different ways and with different priorities, from colonial-through-postcolonial analyses from Anthony Trollope to George Lamming. Ian Strachan’s Paradise and

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Open Access (free)
The potential and limits of EU development cooperation policy
Karin Arts and Anna K. Dickson

This conclusion presents some closing thoughts on concepts discussed in this book. The book assesses the record of development cooperation from the Treaty of Rome to Lomé, and beyond to Cotonou. It also assesses the implications of the trends identified for future development policy and to conceptualise the role of European Union (EU) external action in the realm of development. Development policy constitutes a key aspect of EU foreign policy. The negotiations for future African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)-EU trade aim to create free trade areas between the European Community (EC) and sub-regions of the ACP group. The Cotonou Agreement proposes finally to end the preferential trade margins accorded to non-least developed ACP states in favour of more liberal free trade agreements strongly shaped by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) agenda.

in EU development cooperation
Philip Nanton

Margaret Atwood’s thriller Bodily Harm ( 1998 [1981] ). While the two novels omit any direct reference to a specific country, they speak strongly to the particularity of the smaller Caribbean islands. Finally, I read two political memoirs by Prime Ministers of St Vincent for what they reveal about the frontier: that of James ‘Son’ Mitchell, Prime Minister from 1984 to 2001, and the other by his successor, Ralph

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Sabine Clarke

promoted as institutions at the cutting edge of international scientific research whilst at the same time performing an important service in stimulating industry across the British Caribbean and wider Colonial Empire. The potential of new industry based on the use of cane sugar was endorsed in a report sponsored by the Caribbean Commission, and singled out for praise by the mission of British industrialists that had visited the Caribbean in 1952. When Colonial Office officials considered the achievements of Britain in terms of technical work of benefit to the colonies

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Sue Thomas

‘devices’: ‘Sex’; writing a narrative around ‘an English or American character’ in a Caribbean setting; and ‘Race’. His horror at being categorised as the ‘West Indian’ author of Guerillas might be related to the fact that it does have these stock narrative motors of the popular fiction he so despises, including a ‘quick-to-strip’ female protagonist. While anathematising all of these mechanisms, Naipaul

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom
Alison Donnell

When we think about the factors that have contributed to the beginnings of a West Indian British intellectual tradition, we would commonly bring to mind the towering figure of C. L. R. James and his comrades of the pre- Windrush generation, such as George Padmore. It would also be important to acknowledge the generation of nationalist writers and thinkers based in the Caribbean itself, such

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Philip Nanton

century to the political, economic, social or cultural development of their native land’ (John, 2009 : n.p.). Entitled Pioneers in Nation-Building in a Caribbean Mini-State , the volume drew on conventional frontier notions of individuals from various professional backgrounds – education, press, business, agriculture – who fought against great odds and worked tirelessly to improve nature

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Trevor Burnard

understanding the visceral meaning of the systemic violence that was exerted against African people. That violence happened first in Africa as they were loaded onto slave ships – James Stanfield in a poem on ‘the Guinea Trade’ described them as part of a business that was a ‘vast machine’ that while ‘assum[ing] the honours of a honest trade … had, beneath a prostituted glare [a] poison’d purpose’.5 It continued in the Americas, where Africans were transformed into slaves and were worked relentlessly, especially on sugar plantations, where conditions were harsh – Caribbean

in A global history of early modern violence
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples
David Killingray

In the century following 1850 the West Indies produced a steady flow of West Indian intellectuals, predominantly men, who either spent short spells of time in Europe and North America or who lived outside the Caribbean for a good part of their lives. A significant early figure was Edward W. Blyden; 1 in the twentieth century there were Marcus Garvey, George Padmore, C. L. R. James, Eric

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Robbie Shilliam

that Martinique itself witnessed revolts and rebellions just before, during and just after the Haitian Revolution (Geggus 1996 ). The whole of the Caribbean was in ferment, of course. It is, then, somewhat alarming to find that Fanon effectively quarantines the Haitian Revolution to the realms of colonial unbelief, where Hegel himself had consigned it. In its

in Recognition and Global Politics