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Yulia Karpova

) production. Neodecorativism signalled design professionals’ disappointment with the populist aspirations of the Khrushchev era and, evidently, their tiredness with the role of regulators of mass tastes and consumption patterns. Turning from regulation to reflection, decorative artists broadened the borders of good taste, and reconsidered the relationship between people and things in the age of people’s growing dependence on machines. However, these artists also marked a new social distinction based on post-functionalist aesthetics – a distinction not only from their

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

responsibility for action to individuals. Actors as diverse as self-help authors, public health practitioners, patients’ organisations, health and safety regulators and food and pharmaceutical companies all positioned individual subjects as the locus of imbalance and agent for change. To achieve or maintain balance, these actors suggested that individual citizens, consumers or patients needed to develop new relations to their minds and bodies, to how they perceived, represented and conducted themselves. Such ministrations were only partially altruistic, only partially aimed

in Balancing the self
Yulia Karpova

table-top refrigerators. While the demand for high-capacity refrigerators grew in the US and Western Europe, such models were unsuitable for the small kitchens of Soviet prefabricated flats. They also did not correspond to the modular structure that was established in the Soviet furniture industry. In addition, Soviet refrigerators had a greater weight per volume and mostly lacked temperature regulators, door-opening pedals, auto-defrost and moveable shelves. Moreover, they often had technical deficiencies. KARPOVA 9781526139870 PRINT.indd 128 20/01/2020 11

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Crisis, reform and recovery
Shalendra D. Sharma

political constraints. Phongpaichit and Baker (1998, 15) observe: Partly the macro-managers had tried to have the best of both worlds – the pegged exchange rate which facilitated trade, and the liberalization of finance which stimulated investment. Partly the macro-managers had come to believe the praise accorded them. They refused to heed the advice that this combination would not work. Partly they seemed dazzled by the glamorous financial world which developed in Bangkok in the early 1990s. The regulators seemed reluctant to impose the constraints which would slow it down

in The Asian financial crisis
Richard Parrish

amended its regulations to strengthen the rights of motor sport organisers, circuit owners and participants, and to make it clear that FIA will act impartially as between all forms of motor sport for which it is the regulator. 2 FIA will no longer have a commercial interest in the success of Formula One and the new rules will remove any obstacle to other motor sports series competing with Formula One. 3 FIA will retain its rights over its championships and the use of the ‘FIA’ name and Trade Marks but has removed from its rules any claim over the broadcasting rights to

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Open Access (free)
Issues, debates and an overview of the crisis
Shalendra D. Sharma

corporations, these firms and banks enjoyed a market advantage, and undoubtedly used their access to political leaders to protect their position – making it more difficult for regulators to limit offshore borrowing to prudent levels. This was compounded by the creation of offshore financial markets in which local corporations could (because of regulatory and tax advantages), obtain lower-cost finance than in domestic markets. As was noted earlier, this trend was at its most severe in Thailand. Ironically, the large-scale capital inflows that helped fuel the rapid credit expansion

in The Asian financial crisis