Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 45 items for :

  • "Caribbean" x
  • Refine by access: Open access content x
Clear All
Cricket, Canada and the Caribbean diaspora
Author: Janelle Joseph

This book outlines the ways in which sport helps to create transnational social fields that interconnect migrants dispersed across a region known as the Black Atlantic: England, North America and the Caribbean. Many Caribbean men’s stories about their experiences migrating to Canada, settling in Toronto’s urban and suburban neighbourhoods, finding jobs, returning home for visits, and traveling to other diasporic locations involved some contact with a cricket and social club. The cricket ground brings black Canadians together as a unified community, not only to celebrate their homeland cultures or assuage the pain of the “racial terror” that unifies the Black Atlantic, but also to allay the pain of aging in the diaspora. Players and spectators corporeal practices, post-game activities, sport-related travel, as well as music, food, meetings, fundraisers, parties, and shared stories are analysed in this text as resources deployed to maintain the Black Atlantic, that is, to create deterritorialized communities and racial identities; A close look at what goes on before, during, and after cricket matches provides insights into the contradictions and complexities of Afro-diasporic identity performances, the simultaneous representation of sameness and difference among Afro-Caribbean, African-American, Black British, Indo-Caribbean and South-Asian groups in Canada. This book describes twenty-one months of ethnographic empirical evidence of how black identities are gendered, age-dependent and formed relationally, with boundary making (and crossing) as an active process in multicultural Canada.

Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

’t care. Like I said, you can play for who you want. Me? I done wit' dose people. I stop playin’ wit’ dem. Afro-Caribbean-Canadians resist racism from whites whose homes line the cricket fields on which they play. But this is not the full extent of race relations in Toronto cricket. There are other transnational

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

In my search for tidy conclusions and a singular confirmation of the meaning of sport in the Black Atlantic, I came up empty handed, or “wit’ me two long arms” as cricket club members might say. There are so many dimensions to the transnational flows of peoples and cultures of the Afro-Caribbean diaspora that have important bearing on how we think about black masculinities

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

First Caribbean Days in Canada I play cricket for de telephone company in Barbados. It was June of 1975. I went to dis one game up in St. Andrews village and everyt’ing set for me to leave for Canada de following day. And I remember, like it yesterday, as I walkin’ off de fiel

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

“contrast[s]‌ the national, nationalistic, and ethnically absolute paradigms of cultural criticism to be found in England and [North] America … [and] provides a means to reexamine the problems of nationality, location, identity and historical memory” (Gilroy, 1993 , p. 16). Another “Keep on Moving” song, with lyrics sung by Jamaican reggae icon Bob Marley, is also relevant to black and Caribbean

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

. As black masculinity formed in the Caribbean without clearly defined national communities, black male subjectivity has always been outward looking, linked to black men in other places. Michelle Stephens writes of the black diaspora that “[w]‌hile in contemporary discourse the terms nation and diaspora are often posed in opposition to each other, in certain forms of black discourse from the early

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

as a diasporic group prevents us from understanding the ways in which group boundaries are constantly being (re-)made by people who have experienced the uneven trajectories of ancestry, plurilocal homelands and varied ways of construing sameness and difference. The Afro-Caribbean diaspora is a community fractured by “disjunctures produced by the diverse intersectional experiences of gender, class

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

dem days, but still, I could lash! Stuart Hall provides astute advice concerning the cultural practices of filmmaking in the Afro-Caribbean diaspora: rather than “thinking of identity as an already accomplished fact, which the new cultural practices then represent, we should think, instead, of identity as a

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

. In seminal black diaspora texts, such as C. L. R. James’ Beyond a Boundary and Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, women are often left out of the story, portrayed as non-agents, and erased from the history of black politics and Caribbean travel, not to mention sport. A gender analysis of James’ work by Hazel Carby, in her book Race Men , explains that for

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic
Laura Chrisman

chapter4 21/12/04 11:00 am Page 73 4 Journeying to death: Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic has received huge international acclaim.1 Within American studies, anthropology, black studies, Caribbean studies, cultural studies and literary studies the book has been hailed as a major and original contribution.Gilroy takes issue with the national boundaries within which these disciplines operate, arguing that, as the book jacket tells us there is a culture that is not specifically African, American, Caribbean, or British, but all

in Postcolonial contraventions