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Open Access (free)
Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies
Sean Campbell

practitioners, focusing specifically on its treatment of second-generation Irish rock musicians.3 To this end, the chapter re-examines Dick Hebdige’s Subculture (1979), a formative endeavour in the field’s engagement with questions of race, ethnicity and popular music, before going on to consider the more recent response of cultural studies’ practitioners to ‘Britpop’. This discussion draws attention to the narrow parameters of the ‘ethnicity’ framework underpinning this body of work. For if the field’s reception of secondand third-generation African-Caribbean and South Asian

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Ben Okri, Chenjerai Hove, Dambudzo Marechera
Elleke Boehmer

essentially unfolded as a process of that nation’s coming-into-being. There was a belief, too, in Africa as in South Asia, as in the Caribbean, that the distinctive forms of modernity, in this case in particular the sovereign state, could be incorporated, indigenised, repatriated.2 These may seem at face value rather obvious statements to make about nationalism, which broadly demands some form of belief in the national entity, and acts of loyalty expressed towards it. Yet the obviousness here is part of the point. In post-independence Africa, as in other former colonies

in Stories of women
Manu Samriti Chandler

overtook the White population’. 15 E. D. Rowland, ‘Census of British Guiana, 1891’, Timehri , 6 (June 1892), 56, quoted in Mary Noel Menezes, British Policy towards the Amerindians in British Guiana, 1803–1873 (Georgetown: Caribbean Press, 2011), p. 42. 16 Frank B. Wilderson III, Red, White & Black: Cinema and the Structure of U. S. Antagonisms (Durham: Duke University Press, 2010), p. 5. 17 For Wilderson, writing in the context of the United States, it is the Black American who exists in antagonistic relationship to the human, while ‘[t]he Red

in Worlding the south
An unexpected text in an unexpected place
Michelle Elleray

managerial time spent on discovering petty theft, and hardly a week passed without the summary dismissal of at least one dock labourer’. 11 Kiro thus finds himself inserted into a specific set of economic tensions between the opportunistic thief and the loss-fearing merchant. As their name signals, moreover, the economics of the West India Docks are integrally tied to a colonial history. Invoking a key region of the British Empire, the West India Docks were predicated on economic relations with the Caribbean, and were built to secure the financial interests of planters

in Worlding the south
Theorising the en-gendered nation
Elleke Boehmer

Caribbean), ‘the manipulation of gender politics in the exercise of national rule’, the nation’s ‘sanctioned institutionalisation of gender difference’ – the ‘en-gendering’ of the nation, in Ray’s pithy phrase.2 What, such critics ask, are the rationales and mechanisms through which the nation is almost invariably expressed as a male or male-led community in the Anglophone world, one which may, however, simultaneously be symbolised in the overarching figure of a woman: the woman-as-nation? How is it that, whether nationalism speaks the language of emptiness and desire, or

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Colonial body into postcolonial narrative
Elleke Boehmer

focusing and to some extent summarising the central issues of this chapter. No Telephone to Heaven is structured around a guerrilla incident that took place in Jamaica in the early 1980s. The narrative of this incident is intersected with the personal histories, often truncated, of the main actors involved. In the course of this many-layered account, tracked across three key geographic regions (the Caribbean, North America and Europe), Cliff maps on to her novel an inventory of Jamaican/Caribbean colonial experience. The narrative is strung across episodes blatantly

in Stories of women
Gender and nationalism in the early fiction of Flora Nwapa
Elleke Boehmer

-national encapsulation of what has been seen so far, the Caribbean poet and historian Kamau Brathwaite has addressed his home island of Barbados as ‘mother’, the matrix of this connection with the past, the source of meaning and identity.2 In his writings on India, such as his An Autobiography (1936) and The Discovery of India (1946), as the previous chapter showed, Jawaharlal Nehru idealises and feminises India as an age-old, at once distant and exacting yet nurturing maternal presence.3 Mehboob Khan’s much-discussed 1957 film Mother India definitively represents India as BOEHMER

in Stories of women
De-scribing Imperial identity from alien to migrant
Peter Childs

Hall argues that the contemporary significance of diaspora in the Caribbean can be apprehended through Lacan’s theory of enunciation and its implications for identity. If the speaking and spoken subject do not coincide then ‘identity’ is therefore not an essence but a positioning in discourse, and that positioning, or representation, will itself be conditioned by the position spoken from. Hall adds to this Derrida’s theory of meaning, which is always deferred as it forever disseminates along endless chains of signifiers: meaning is constantly moving. While not quite

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay and Gerry Smyth

’ musical practices – whether Celtic, Caribbean, sub-continental, or whatever – throughout the archipelago. Norquay_01_Intro 8 22/3/02, 9:30 am 9 Introduction The idea is not to replace an historical imperative with a geographical one, but to relieve the intellectual hegemony of the former while pointing out the complete interpenetration of each by the other.2 For on consideration it turns out that the wide variety of power structures extant throughout ‘the British Isles’ has always been as much about the desire to master space as about the drive to order time. The

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Elleke Boehmer

Caribbean – by way of illustration. As a structure Stories of women falls roughly into three (unmarked) parts, framed by the Introduction and the Conclusion, though there are numerous intertextual links connecting different chapters between and across these ostensible divides. First, chapters 1 to 4 group together to theorise and exemplify the gendered formation of the nation in text. Chapter 1, ‘Motherlands, mothers and nationalist sons’, examines why and how, overdetermined by colonial history, national structures in post-independent nations have conventionally been

in Stories of women