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Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

whose goal is to lay bare the feminist themes that are central to the genre. Principal among these is that representations of father–daughter incest often cause works to be placed in the gendered subgenre of Female Gothic and to be viewed through a lens predicated on this generic division. What frequently stems from this homogenising gesture is a misinterpretation or misrepresentation of the ambition of

in Gothic incest
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Incest and beyond
Jenny DiPlacidi

scientific insights. The interdisciplinary approach enables readings that expose the ways in which different incestuous relationships engage with eighteenth-century concerns over family, social obligation, individual rights, inheritance laws and desire. The fruits of this broad methodology are evidenced through recent works on the Gothic such as Diana Wallace and Andrew Smith’s The Female Gothic: New

in Gothic incest
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Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

generation to usurp the sexual rights of the younger generation, while the Gothic novel written by women represents incest as a cultural taboo which functions to repress the sexual desires of women’. 14 Mellor’s assessment represents what a large proportion of scholarship on the genre argues: that meanings of incest differ based on their presence in works designated as Male or Female Gothic. Such

in Gothic incest
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Female sexual agency and male victims
Jenny DiPlacidi

the patriarchy in some way.’ 20 This analysis of the mother is particularly relevant to scholarly discourse positioning the Female Gothic in opposition to the Male Gothic as in the latter the mother is often rearticulated into the most ‘unnatural’ mother of all: the incestuous mother capable of aggressive sexual agency or the power to refuse sexual access to the female body. An overrepresentation of

in Gothic incest
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Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

representation of the overthrow of a tyrannical father, by showing the father to have been a usurper all along’. 5 If this is true of Walpole’s work, then later Gothic novels take up this Oedipal drive in a different way, exposing the figure of the uncle as usurper of both the rightful father and the niece. Although many scholarly accounts claim that one of the hallmarks of the Female Gothic is a tendency to show the father as

in Gothic incest
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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

Romantic-era Irish literary gothic also emphasises the falsity of our assumption that contemporary English gothic literature almost universally deploys Catholic Continental locales. Far from anomalous in the British gothic output of his day, Melville's evocative depictions of local geography represent an established pattern that has been all too often dismissed. As Kilfeather has noted, ‘critical attention to the eighteenth-century female gothic novel has been so dominated by readings of Ann Radcliffe that Radcliffe's Italian and French settings have been defined as

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

–sister relationships, but to understand several crucial things about the treatment of sibling love and how scholarship has traditionally treated it. Since the reclamation of the Female Gothic by feminist critics in the 1970s the genre has been delineated as articulating fears of domestic entrapment and patriarchal power. The incest thematic has primarily been theorised in such scholarship as a means of underscoring

in Gothic incest
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Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

the more prolific individual woman novelist)’ from the 1780s onwards. 64 Representative of a newly democratised print culture wherein the production and accessibility of books was dramatically widened, these works underscore the literary gothic's importance to a new era of female writing. In their frequent evocation of the fraught realities of women's existence in a patriarchal society at the very moment that women began to enter the literary marketplace in serious numbers, these works embody the ‘female Gothic’ influentially identified by Ellen Moers. In other

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Jane Eyre in Elizabeth Stoddard’s New England
Anne-Marie Ford

), displays the influence that Brontë had upon her writing. Both Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847) and Stoddard’s The Morgesons are written in the first person, and both begin with the heroine as a child, before bringing her, at the age of eighteen, to her first sexual encounter. The heroine’s progress from beginning to end is given a psycho-social context by employing what has come to be known as female Gothic, a mode which expresses women’s sexual fantasies and fears, as well as their rage at male oppression, and is itself derived from the Gothic writings of late eighteenth

in Special relationships
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

tale. 70 Owenson's later fictions – national tales and otherwise – have tended to lend themselves more readily to analysis as gothic hybrids. Gary Kelly, for instance, classifies The missionary (1811) as gothic, including it in the six-volume Varieties of female gothic (2002), while Jim Kelly reads Florence MacCarthy (1818) as ‘demonstrat[ing] … [that] the Irish landscape and the visible scars of conflict provided a Gothic text in its own right’. 71 W.J. McCormack, for his part, includes excerpts of The O'Briens and the O'Flahertys (1827) in his influential

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829