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Emigration and the spread of Irish religious influence
Sarah Roddy

unrelated phrase – ‘British empire’.2 Yet as many historians of Ireland, its diaspora and particularly the Irish Catholic Church have noted, the existence of a peculiarly Irish ‘spiritual empire’ was widely spoken of even as the country’s ports remained choked with emigrants. This concept, normally involving the perception of a special, God-given emigrants’ ‘mission’ to spread the faith in whatever part of the world they settled, is somewhat problematic given the practical limitations explored in chapter three. Nevertheless, as a continually employed explanation of Irish

in Population, providence and empire
Open Access (free)
Sarah Roddy

spiritual and moral dangers at ports and at sea, were surprisingly lacking, however. At no time did the Irish Catholic Church as a body either originate or lend wholehearted support to adequate emigrant welfare initiatives, although individual clergy doubtless made a difference to the fate of many vulnerable migrants. This reluctance to commit what were acknowledged to be necessary resources to the departing extended also to the departed. While in purely numerical terms the Irish church’s pastoral efforts on behalf of the diaspora were extensive, as Chapter Three argues

in Population, providence and empire
Martine Pelletier

with the sacred, its paganism that has resisted all efforts at Christianisation, his own included. The Irish Catholic Church has sought to repress the pagan rituals of the ancestral Celtic culture, represented in the play by the Lughnasa festival and its bonfires and animal sacrifices, but in Ryanga, pagan rituals and ceremonies still permit a spiritual communion which does not deny the body. Jack’s tales of African customs – in which dancing, polygamy and love-children feature prominently – holds out an image of a world in which the sexual energy of women is neither

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Sarah Roddy

historians have hypothesised that a concern for the religious welfare of the departed may have coloured clerical condemnation of the exodus, there has been little substantiating analysis of the pastoral response of the Irish Catholic Church to the mass out-movement of their congregations.33 Examination of what the Freeman’s Journal termed ‘priests for the emigrants’ has instead been the almost exclusive preserve of ecclesiastical historians, often moonlighting clergy, who have arguably treated the subject of the pastoral response of the Catholic Church with excessive

in Population, providence and empire
Patrick Doyle

Oldcastle, County Meath, attacked the book as ‘rather the drivel of a charlatan than a university-trained thinker’ in the nationalist newspaper, Freeman's Journal . He called Plunkett's work ‘mean and insidious’ and set a template for further attacks from Catholic hierarchy and clergy. 25 Barry's broadside precipitated Cardinal Logue's Pastoral in which the leader of the Irish Catholic Church condemned the book ‘though he admits he has not read it’. 26 Several months later, the rector of the Irish College in Rome, Monsignor Michael O’Riordan, responded to the

in Civilising rural Ireland
Open Access (free)
The clergy and emigration in practice
Sarah Roddy

O’Brien (the daughter of William Smith O’Brien) also failed to capture the Irish Catholic Church’s whole-hearted cooperation. Having interested herself in the plight of ‘unprotected’ single female emigrants – who formed a disproportionately large number of the Irish exodus in the later nineteenth century87 and attracted a good deal of moral panic as a result – O’Brien attempted to persuade the Catholic Church to open a safe boarding house for them at Queenstown. This was to no avail, and she subsequently founded, ran and largely funded the home herself.88 Mindful

in Population, providence and empire
The pastoral responses of the Irish churches to emigration
Sarah Roddy

Catholic provision of clergy to its emigrants from the corresponding Irish Protestant missions was the significant extent to which the receiving churches and the emigrants themselves directly contributed towards the clergy they asked for, via the half-fee system and foreign collection tours. What the Irish Catholic Church offered its emigrants by way of religious aid, then, was simply personnel, and if anything, financial aid for religious purposes went in the opposite direction. As noted, students of All Hallows bore a considerable financial burden. Most had to find £10

in Population, providence and empire