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Open Access (free)
Sarah Roddy

church faced when considering emigration, between expanding its ecclesiastical influence abroad and maintaining its demographic position at home, seemed substantively resolved by the turn of the century. As far as the church’s own institutional interests were concerned, emigration had turned out to be a largely unsought and unanticipated boon. It helped to blunt the impact of evangelical proselytism, further increased the priest-to-people ratio 236 Roddy_Population_Printer.indd 236 15/09/2014 11:47 Conclusion at home, gave an outlet for ever-increasing Irish

in Population, providence and empire
Emigration and the spread of Irish religious influence
Sarah Roddy

further self-congratulation. It was repeatedly asserted that Irish Catholics had proved themselves ‘inviolably attached’ to their religion, and capable of retaining their faith through centuries of challenges.17 Most recently, neither penal laws nor opportunistic proselytism had swayed anything more than a small minority away from Catholicism. As Cardinal Gibbons of Baltimore observed of the Irish, ‘no other people ever suffered for their Catholic faith as they’.18 This, many commentators felt, put Irish Catholicism on a higher plain. A Donnybrook priest told his

in Population, providence and empire
Open Access (free)
The change in mentality
Simha Goldin

the centuries that followed, the Jews experienced a religious crisis that led to certain cases of willing conversion to Christianity; there were apostate Jews who caused their brethren great harm in every realm, so that their self-confidence progressively declined in light of this phenomenon. The representation of the convert to Christianity as one who was undeserving from the outset to be considered as part of the Jewish people made it easier to accept this phenomenon, particularly as it was accompanied by that of proselytism, of Christians of a high level who were

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
Jeremy C.A. Smith

interlocutors. However, the anomalies of the Axial Age paradigm are still hard to wish away. The civilisation that most closely integrates religious and civilisational coherence is Islamicate civilisation, which was not included in early debates about axiality.When religious coherence is overstated, other aspects of civilisational development can be overlooked. A  few examples help illustrate the point. For instance, the logics of imperial expansion are not adequately related to successful campaigns of proselytism (Spohn, 2010:  59). Nationalism, which should figure as a

in Debating civilisations
Emigration and sectarian rivalry
Sarah Roddy

its rottenness for a time; it is a sore, all the appearances whereof indicate proximate suppuration [...] Are all the energies of the new association [Catholic Defence 163 Roddy_Population_Printer.indd 163 15/09/2014 11:47 Population, providence and empire Association] to be directed to prevent the proselytism of a few? Is there to be no voice raised, no hope held out, that will keep the people at home, and thus save millions from spiritual destruction?91 If Mullen thereby hoped to concentrate clerical minds on the emi­­­ grant’s spiritual plight, he succeeded

in Population, providence and empire
Open Access (free)
The clergy and emigration in practice
Sarah Roddy

being obliged to keep it ‘in a dull Scotch fashion’, alongside the common reality of having to negotiate with the captain to allow any religious gathering amenable to the non-majority creed on board, cannot have inspired much confidence in home clergy that emigrants would remain untainted.65 Consequently, there was trepidation on all sides that the religiously mixed atmosphere of emigrant ships provided an ideal environment for proselytism. The French priest Adolphe Perraud was fearful that where a chaplain was present on ships carrying Irish Catholic 70 Roddy

in Population, providence and empire
The parliamentary arena
Ami Pedahzur

labours of the Jewish Defence League. At first, the rabbi–leader and his supporters mounted demonstrations against the Soviet government and began to wage war against Christian proselytism and the ‘Black Hebrews’ of Dimona. However, in August 1972, Kahane redirected the goals of his organisation to concentrate on the group which would eventually become the principal object of his ‘attentions’ – the Arabs. That same year, he launched an operation entitled ‘The Arabs Don’t Belong Here, They Must Go’. The goal of this operation was to encourage Arab emigration in exchange

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence