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Divine destruction in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Chloe Porter

Andrew Borlik, ‘“More than Art”: Clockwork Automata, the Extemporising Actor, and the Brazen Head in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay ’, in Wendy Beth Hyman (ed.), The Automaton in English Renaissance Literature (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011 ), pp. 129–44, p. 130. 6 George Molland, ‘Bacon, Roger

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Sukanta Chaudhuri

. Bucolic and Pastoral from Theocritus to Wordsworth, Amsterdam: J. C. Gieben, 1990. Paul J. Alpers, What Is Pastoral?, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. Andrew McRae, God Speed the Plough. The Representation of Agrarian England, 1500– 1660, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Thomas K. Hubbard, The Pipes of Pan. Intertextuality and Literary Filiation in the Pastoral Tradition from Theocritus to Milton, Ann Arbor, MI: University of ­Michigan Press, 1998. Ken Hiltner, What Else Is Pastoral? Renaissance Literature and the Environment, Ithaca, NY: Cornell

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance
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Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

Wendy Beth Hyman (ed.), The Automaton in English Renaissance Literature (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2011), pp. 61–78; see also Wolfe, Humanism, Machinery and Renaissance Literature , pp. 203–35. For a discussion of Talus and Renaissance automata, see Sawday, Engines of the Imagination , p. 191. 63

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The ends of incompletion
Chloe Porter

calls concepts of wholeness into question, the place of such concepts in critical discourse on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature remains curiously unaddressed. Cynthia Marshall, for example, implies the pre-existence of a concept of psychic wholeness in the suggestion that ‘a Renaissance literature of self-shattering’ offers readers and spectators ‘an experience of psychic fracture’. 12

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Simon Wortham

-Reaganite and post-Thatcherite) state. Thus censorship and criticism become self-identical terms that can be juxtaposed in a stable opposition; the critic is “opposed” to censorship.’6 Price_09_Ch9 181 14/10/02, 9:50 am 182 Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis Of course, cultural materialists must oppose and expose, too, reactionary standpoints on Renaissance literature and culture by showing them to be politically motivated, thus revealing their ostensible apoliticism as an ideological smokescreen. As the foreword to Political Shakespeare puts it, cultural materialism ‘does

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
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Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

. 59 Dollimore, ‘Art in a Time of War’, p. 43. The emphasis is in the text. 60 On new formalism, see Marjorie Levinson, ‘What is New Formalism?’, PMLA , 122:2 (2007), 558–69; for new formalism and early modern literature, see Mark David Rasmussen (ed.), Renaissance

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Lucy Munro

, ‘Reading the Body: The Revenger’s Tragedy and the Jacobean Theater of Consumption’, Renaissance Drama, 18 (1987), 121–48; Cavell, ‘“Who Does the Wolf Love?”: Reading Coriolanus’, Representations, 3 (1983), 1–20; Britland, ‘Circe’s Cup: Wine and Women in Early Modern Drama’, in A Pleasing Sinne: Drink and Conviviality in Seventeenth-Century England, ed. by Adam Smyth (Woodbridge: Brewer, 2004), pp. 109–25. For useful overviews of the field see Patricia Cahill, ‘Take Five: Renaissance Literature and the Study of the Senses’, Literature Compass, 6 (2009), 1014–30; Holly

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

. 8 See O’Connell, The Idolatrous Eye , p. 141; Julia Reinhard Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology and Renaissance Literature (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996 ), pp. 213–17. 9 See Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints , p. 215

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Theory and Spenserian practice
Rachel E. Hile

. “Horatian” vs. “Menippean” have continued to develop the new-critical taxonomic impulse by focusing on form and tone. Instead of adding a new type of taxonomy, I want to bring to the study of Renaissance literature more recent satire theorists’ approaches, which, taken together, constitute what we might call a “social turn” in satire studies, expressed most succinctly in W. Scott Blanchard’s definition of satire as a “genre for the expression of social dissensus” (“Renaissance prose satire,” 118). The decision to write general or indirect or direct satire—and these should

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Imitation of Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

referencing not Spenser but Spenser’s own stated poetic forebears, especially Chaucer and Skelton, but also, in passing, Mantuan. Drayton draws on late medieval bird satires, especially as developed by John Skelton’s Speke Parott, to allude to Spenser without referencing him too directly. Dense networks of allusions characterize almost all Renaissance literature, and poets use these allusions, especially at times of anxiety, to create or clarify where they are in the literary field, where they stand in, in Bourdieu’s phrase, that “space of positions” (Bourdieu, “Field of

in Spenserian satire