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Ruut Veenhoven
,
Nivré Claire Wagner
, and
Jan Ott

also attract unwelcome animals, such as snakes, and create unsafe places. Why focus on happiness? There is much research on the effect of urban green on various aspects of ‘well-being’, such as outdoor recreation ( Chapter 22 of this book). It is difficult to strike the balance of these effects; happiness captures the total effect. Notions of ‘well

in Rural quality of life
Nikolas Rose

Can contemporary developments in the life sciences help us understand the ways in which ‘adversity’ shapes mental health conditions in the heterogeneous conglomerations we call cities? Many have pointed to the evidence that those living in cities are more likely to be diagnosed with mild, moderate and severe mental disorders than those living in rural settings. But it has proved difficult to identify precisely what it is in the urban experience that leads to these elevated rates. The same is true of research that has addressed urban mental health in migrant and

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Situating peripheries research in South Africa and Ethiopia
Paula Meth
,
Alison Todes
,
Sarah Charlton
,
Tatenda Mukwedeya
,
Jennifer Houghton
,
Tom Goodfellow
,
Metadel Sileshi Belihu
,
Zhengli Huang
,
Divine Mawuli Asafo
,
Sibongile Buthelezi
, and
Fikile Masikane

Introduction This chapter explores how transformation in the spatial peripheries of three African city regions is shaped, governed and experienced, drawing on the findings of a three-year Economic and Social Research Council/National Research Foundation (ESRC/NRF) funded research project in South Africa and Ethiopia. We discuss both intellectual and methodological challenges, along with reflective insights of undertaking research on the dynamics and drivers of change and the ‘lived experiences’ of residents living on the

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
Back to the future
Alex Gekker
,
Sam Hind
,
Sybille Lammes
,
Chris Perkins
, and
Clancy Wilmott

approaches to them. Adam highlights seven features of time: time frame; temporality; timing; tempo; duration; sequence and modalities (for an explanation of their significance see chapter 1 this volume). By examining each section of this collected volume in relation to its emerging internal consistency with Adam’s typology, we highlight how different authors foreground different aspects of temporality. In doing so, we suggest aspects that have perhaps been underanalysed and where future research might profitably focus. Ephemerality/mobility Against the grand scales of

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Henrik Lauridsen Lolle

book The Triumph of the City (Glaeser, 2011 ). However, in recent years, research from all over the global North has shown either no difference in subjective well-being between rural and urban areas, or even higher average levels of subjective well-being in rural areas (Burger et al., 2020 ; Okulicz-Kozaryn, 2017 ; Sørensen, 2013 ; Berry & Okulicz-Kozaryn, 2011 ). In

in Rural quality of life
Pia Heike Johansen
,
Jens Kaae Fisker
,
Henrik Lauridsen Lolle
,
Anne Tietjen
, and
Evald Bundgård Iversen

.8 per cent) and even more so when compared to Copenhagen residents (74.7 per cent) (Realdania, 2018 ). In a bid to explain these results and explore their wider implications, the foundation convened a multidisciplinary group of researchers for a four-year research project. This book is one of the outcomes of that project. Instead of just reporting findings from our research in the Danish countryside, however, we have commissioned

in Rural quality of life
The case of community initiatives promoting cycling and walking in São Paulo and London
Tim Schwanen
and
Denver V. Nixon

composition and so on tends to prevail in the recent academic literature (Ballas, 2013 ; Okuliz-Kozaryn, 2015 ; Winters and Li, 2017 ). Other research has considered how everyday time use in the city, including transport, shapes wellbeing (De Vos et al., 2013 ; Schwanen and Wang, 2014 ; Birenboim, 2018 ). Work along these lines typically understands wellbeing as a subjective state that inheres in individuals and can be measured quantitatively (Atkinson, 2013 ). This mode of analysis is in keeping with the neoliberal governmental regimes under which wellbeing has

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
A capability approach to voluntarism, inclusion and quality of life in rural Norway
Kjersti Tandberg
and
Jill Merethe Loga

Introduction Central topics in research on the quality of life, well-being and health are the importance of interaction, social networks, inclusion and trust. The voluntary sector constitutes a field in society outside the family, the state and the market, where so-called secondary social relations are produced and maintained. Research on the

in Rural quality of life
Insight from Scotland
Kathryn Colley
,
Margaret Currie
, and
Katherine N. Irvine

natural environments and well-being, a field of research which has hitherto focused largely on urban settings and populations. The chapter begins by outlining theories linking outdoor recreation and well-being at the individual level and then discusses nature-based interventions to promote outdoor recreation in rural areas. It goes on to assess the overall contribution of outdoor

in Rural quality of life
Open Access (free)
Learning from communities in informal settlements in Durban, South Africa
Maria Christina Georgiadou
and
Claudia Loggia

been successful to date. By contrast, participatory techniques in the design and construction of housing have been used to enhance community empowerment and a sense of local ownership. However, participation and collaboration can mean various things for informal housing upgrading, and often the involvement of local communities is limited to providing feedback in already agreed development decisions from local authorities and construction companies. This research lies under the umbrella of sustainable bottom-up urban regeneration. As part of a

in African cities and collaborative futures