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Open Access (free)
Quality of life, civil participation and outlooks for a rural future
Anders Melås
,
Maja Farstad
, and
Svein Frisvoll

, which refers to informal networks and the sense of belonging (Wallace et al., 2017 ). Putnam ( 2000 ) included this in his definition, but he did not take participation through the Internet and social media into account. Johansen and Fisker ( 2020 ) found that social media does not alter how interaction in rural communities unfolds but rather that it is being used in the same

in Rural quality of life
Ruut Veenhoven
,
Nivré Claire Wagner
, and
Jan Ott

voluntary participants in organised walks in the wild (Richardson et al., 2016 ) can be due to other causes than meeting of an innate need for contact with nature. Similarly, the observation by Chang et al. ( 2020 ) that users of social media share more pictures of nature in relation to leisure and vacation activities does not prove the biophilia theory. A more detailed critical

in Rural quality of life
Open Access (free)
Mapping times
Alex Gekker
,
Sam Hind
,
Sybille Lammes
,
Chris Perkins
, and
Clancy Wilmott

approach. New forms of ‘liveness’ are being called into effect by the technological assemblage around social media (Van Es, 2016). But, despite an intensifying narrative around ‘real-time’ digital capabilities, little attempt has been  made to  unpack  such claims to technological immediacy. Also, despite routinely  hyperbolic promises of ‘live’ data streams, ‘background’ updates and ‘reflexive’ systems, most digital users are faced with intermittent or incomplete Introduction: mapping times 13 data streams, intrusive or unwarranted updates and largely unresponsive

in Time for mapping
The case for practice theory
Matthew Hanchard

anywhere on the planet – volunteering their geolocation for public viewing on social media. Likewise, even seemingly unrelated practices like buying a house (landed capital investment) are now informed by digital maps. Property searches offer ready spatialisation of public datasets (school reports, crime statistics and boundary areas) set against the property type. Homebuyers now have the ability to narrow their shortlist criteria and create their own ­mapping prior to viewing, destabilising the sales practices of estate agents. Alongside complex developments in the

in Time for mapping
David Beel
and
Claire Wallace

, locals and incomers. The increasing resources available online through the Internet, through public databases and even through commercial organisations offering to help trace family histories have made this view of the past all much more accessible. Social media, including the sharing of photographs on Facebook pages and Facebook groups have helped generate shared interests in revisiting

in Rural quality of life
Open Access (free)
Back to the future
Alex Gekker
,
Sam Hind
,
Sybille Lammes
,
Chris Perkins
, and
Clancy Wilmott

weather or disease maps), or else sought to build and expand upon it (e.g. various social media-based reaction maps). A tension thus exists between the formalisation of time, and its informal destabilisation. Michiel de Lange’s chapter complicates this unstable notion of temporality. Discussing the problematics of the smart city dashboard’s ‘real-time’, he builds on sociologist Barbara Adam’s (2008) work to further disassemble the idea of temporal instability. He argues for an asynchronous approach to the city that ‘highlights latency, recurrence, deferred understanding

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas
Rachel Wells

maps constructed out of them, and as they are used in social media sites online, our identities are increasingly shrunk to fit them. Weileder’s Atlas, in its insistence on adding to the photograph, on splicing time and space together beyond the conventional photographic process, suggests that photography, per se, is no longer understood as a ‘strange weave of space and time’, but is rather a contributing factor to our lack of understanding of physical time or space. Weileder’s additions to the photographic process reinforce that crossed 126 Stitching memories

in Time for mapping
A trialogue
Sybille Lammes
,
Kate McLean
, and
Chris Perkins

, Howes and Synnott (1994) suggests that the gulf between our deodorised lives and that of ancient history is deep and wide. If you go back to Roman times, then cities were very smelly places before we had waste treatment. Figure 3.7  Contrasting smellscapes of the West End of London, mashup showing emissions, nature, food and animal smells against an OSM backdrop, as recorded in social media (courtesy of Schifanella Rossano, http://goodcitylife.org/smellymaps/). This figure has not been made available under a CC licence. Permission to reproduce it must be sought from

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
The bridge, the fund and insurance in Dar es Salaam
Irmelin Joelsson

that had to be learned and then refined, with daily posts on social media depicting business-like situations, surrounded by laptops and smartphones in the exclusive environments his job lent access to. The imagery invokes the idea that the display of a successful lifestyle, albeit ‘staged’, would also attract success; proximity to money would attract money in turn. However, the excessive display of wealth in that setting, working as a sort of backdrop, did not necessarily reflect his everyday calibration of relationships, which on the other hand were discrete and

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
Situating peripheries research in South Africa and Ethiopia
Paula Meth
,
Alison Todes
,
Sarah Charlton
,
Tatenda Mukwedeya
,
Jennifer Houghton
,
Tom Goodfellow
,
Metadel Sileshi Belihu
,
Zhengli Huang
,
Divine Mawuli Asafo
,
Sibongile Buthelezi
, and
Fikile Masikane

different modes of access to residents in case study areas (detailed above in relation to gatekeeping) or because of the sampling of surveys or the benefits of social media. Finally, variability may be shaped by the ordering of data collection as it rolled out in a different sequence (via surveys first or diaries and interviews first) for reasons beyond our control. Conclusions: the diversity of the peripheries This chapter has set out various intellectual and methodological realities and challenges as we reflect on how we have

in African cities and collaborative futures