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Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

4 Claims to legitimate authority and discursive attacks We don’t believe in the authorities anymore. When you say … ‘there, that’s the new administrator, everyone may clap but with a certain mockery …’ Him also, what is he going to do? (Peasant Union Member (no. 151) 2010) We could wonder about the role of that whispered language within the political system of unanimity. It is, to my mind, a way of softening the overwhelming and restrictive official language in order to make it more bearable; it is an antidote. Irony and humour are the weapons of the powerless

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Elisha P. Renne

11 Polio vaccination, political authority and the Nigerian state Elisha P. Renne So I told him [a soldier] that even if they are going to kill me, I will not allow the governor to enter my house … I also said in the governor's presence that even if President Jonathan comes here, I will not allow them to immunize my child. So the governor

in The politics of vaccination
Laura Chrisman

chapter8 21/12/04 11:21 am Page 138 8 Robert Young and the ironic authority of postcolonial criticism When I chanced on postcolonial scholar Robert Young’s Textual Practice review of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s Outside in the Teaching Machine, I was startled to find an attack on Benita Parry among its pages.1 It comes early on, when Young is preparing the ground for a detailed exposition of Spivak’s book by comparing Spivak’s general critical standing with that of Edward Said and Homi Bhabha (who together create Young’s chief constellation of postcolonial

in Postcolonial contraventions
Elana Wilson Rowe

5 Non-​state actors and the quest for authority in Arctic governance The modern state, as discussed in Chapter 1, can be considered a relative newcomer to the cross-​border politics of the Arctic region. However, states have featured prominently in the preceding two chapters. We have come to see how advantageous positions earned by/​granted to states vis-​à-​vis other states matter for shaping the rules of the road in Arctic cooperative governance –​and ultimately shape outcomes. In this chapter, I seek to broaden the net to explore the positions of key non

in Arctic governance
Positioning, Politics and Pertinence
Natalie Roberts

authorities with the disease was exacerbated by the failure of the WHO to provide effective leadership, MSF’s apparent technical superiority, capacity for rapid action and vocal public positioning meant the organisation was still regarded by many as the de facto leader of the response ( Check Hayden, 2015 ). After criticising the leadership of the WHO as ‘slow, derisory and irresponsible’ ( MSF, 2014 ), MSF convened international discussions and trained

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Hakim Khaldi

to coordinate their actions as much as possible. From Damascus to the Rebel-Held North-West In June 2011, as the Syrian government violently suppressed demonstrations by its opponents, MSF France attempted to negotiate permission to work out of Damascus. But meeting with the authorities proved impossible. The Syrian intelligence services had closed the offices of MSF’s Spanish section a few weeks previously, accusing it of supporting the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

financial responsibilities are not only the result of displacement, the pressures of life in exile and the more prolonged absence of husbands: they also coincide with a phase in our interviewees’ lifecycle in which they traditionally acquire greater authority as elders, especially as mothers-in-law. Due to their distinct positioning in their families, older female refugees experience displacement differently from younger women. Most of our Syrian interlocutors are in their

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

. At a first glance, the extraordinary response in Germany was puzzling. First, this was not the first time that the ship of an NGO had been prevented from disembarking the migrants it had rescued in the Mediterranean. There had been similar incidents involving the governments of Italy and Malta in 2018 and earlier in 2019 that had affected a larger number of migrants but which had not generated as much publicity as the case of the Sea-Watch 3 . It was not the first time either that Italian or Maltese authorities had laid charges against the captain or crew of a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Katrina Navickas

The Peterloo Massacre was more than just a Manchester event. The attendees, on whom Manchester industry depended, came from a large spread of the wider textile regions. The large demonstrations that followed in the autumn of 1819, protesting against the actions of the authorities, were pan-regional and national. The reaction to Peterloo established the massacre as firmly part of the radical canon of martyrdom in the story of popular protest for democracy. This article argues for the significance of Peterloo in fostering a sense of regional and northern identities in England. Demonstrators expressed an alternative patriotism to the anti-radical loyalism as defined by the authorities and other opponents of mass collective action.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
France and its war dead in 1914 and 1915
Adrien Douchet, Taline Garibian, and Benoît Pouget

The aim of this article is to shed light on the conditions under which the funerary management of human remains was carried out by the French authorities during the early years of the First World War. It seeks to understand how the urgent need to clear the battlefield as quickly as possible came into conflict with the aspiration to give all deceased an individualised, or at the very least dignified, burial. Old military funerary practices were overturned and reconfigured to incorporate an ideal that sought the individual identification of citizen soldiers. The years 1914–15 were thus profoundly marked by a clash between the pragmatism of public health authorities obsessed with hygiene, the infancy of emerging forensic science, the aching desire of the nation to see its children buried individually and various political and military imperatives related to the conduct of the war.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal