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An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister
Juliano Fiori

first time in modern history, the major global power – I am of course referring to the US – doesn’t have a project for the world. It is evident that the US has always defended its own interests, but it always imagined or at least presented its interests – I’m not casting a value judgement here – as linked to a project for the world. Following the Second World War, it was the Americans who assumed primary responsibility for the creation of the international system, starting with Roosevelt. Some international institutions were accessible to all

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Catherine Akurut

the communities within which they reside ( Turchik et al. , 2016 : 143). This would require shifting away from the language that exclusively focuses on casting men as perpetrators and women as victims of violence ( Turchik et al. , 2016 : 137). For example, one of the mechanisms for receiving clients within humanitarian settings includes having the literature about CRSV on display. The language used in these areas for receiving victims

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Arjun Claire

. Solidarity provides a sound moral framework to bridge reason and emotion. It also addresses the flaws of témoignage, which has fostered a humanitarian-centric vision of change and a de-politicised humanity, foregrounding the physical needs of human beings, and casting social, economic, emotional and spiritual needs as matters outside the humanitarian realm. The humanitarian enterprise is still widely seen as a patronising undertaking, mirroring deep

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The nature of the development-security industry
Jenny H. Peterson

industry (Winer, 2005), similarly evokes images of casting moral judgements by dividing those who meet the required western standards of operation from those who do not. As such, western actors are exalted over those who stray too far from the idealised liberal form. As shown, liberalism is a political project that relies on a number of strategies which are in and of themselves damaging to the goals of peace and security programming and in turn, political-economic transformation. Through depoliticisation, the task of rebuilding war-affected states is portrayed as a

in Building a peace economy?
DSI approaches and behaviours
Jenny H. Peterson

casting judgements are perhaps not well placed to make such claims given their own contributions to these economies. Furthermore, it is unfair and unrealistic to expect domestic institutions and less powerful international operational actors to be responsible for the transformation of political-economic structures that have in part been created and sustained by powerful foreign actors. This is especially relevant when the ability to transform war economies becomes a condition for sovereignty or acceptance into international institutions and communities. In this sense

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
‘Numbers games’ and ‘holocausts’ at Jasenovac and Bleiburg
David Bruce MacDonald

either ‘Serbophobia’ or ‘Greater Serbia’. This chapter reviews two of the most important persecution myths emerging from the Second World War. Revising the history of the Ustaša-run death-camp at Jasenovac was a useful means of casting Serbs as the victims of a ‘Holocaust’ by Croats. On the Croatian side, the massacre at Bleiburg (Austria) by Communist forces (or Serb-led Communists, as the case might be) in 1945 was also likened to the Holocaust. In both cases, the other side was accused of committing genocide, using either the mask of Nazi or Communist domination to

in Balkan holocausts?
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Ross M. English

constituents. There is, however, much material to suggest that the image of members of Congress as ‘single-minded seekers of reelection’ is an oversimplification. Richard Fenno produced a model where legislators have not one, but three primary goals.6 For Fenno, the goal of re-election is joined by two Representatives and Senators 45 others: making good policy and gaining influence within Congress. Naturally, if taking a position on a policy or casting a vote in a certain direction is likely to have a direct effect on their election chances, members will change their

in The United States Congress
Open Access (free)
Ross M. English

of a committee is not to provide benefits to its own members (although this may still happen), but to act as the ‘brains’ of Congress. No member can be an expert on all issues, especially as legislation is frequently technically complex. Members want to be assured that the laws they are casting their votes for are wellresearched and will not have any major unforeseen negative consequences. The committees are the way in which the House and Senate delegate the job of researching and formulating legislation, to try and ensure that the legislation which is eventually

in The United States Congress
Open Access (free)
Luke Martell

’s community – casting doubt on whether it is actually communitarian, whether communitarianism is a justification for something else and whether New Labour’s communitarianism really is true to the roots it claims in the thought of people like John Macmurray and Amita Etzioni. Part IV analyses the discourse of the Third Way and offers some concluding

in The Third Way and beyond