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Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media
Heather Blatt

for current work. Henry Jenkins, who coined the term ‘participatory culture’, offers a useful distinction between participation and interaction, which might otherwise seem synonymous. Interaction is mediated by tools; clicking a link that takes one from one web page to another constitutes interaction. Participation, in contrast, develops through social relations, casting light upon not simply the technology, but also the culture it shapes and by which it is shaped.3 To use participation as a concept through which one can scrutinize a literary culture requires

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Beowulf translations by Seamus Heaney and Thomas Meyer
David Hadbawnik

. Almost as striking as Meyer's visual arrangement of the text is his narrative alteration in casting the Geatish woman's lament on its own page, in the first person. This places the passage in the context of Old English elegies, most obviously ‘The Wife's Lament’, while also hinting at short, first-person lyric poems such as those of Pound, H.D., and later Creeley. 83 The allusion to ‘The Wife's Lament’ makes sense, as that elegy reflects the rhetorical situation of the Geatish woman in Beowulf writ large. As a type

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes
Heather Blatt

of the foundational Theban narrative that the Knight’s Tale then concludes. When readers approached the Siege in this manner, then the relationship between the Siege and the Canterbury Tales developed by Lydgate suggests less about failure than it does about success. For these readers, the Siege of Thebes and Lydgate pave the way for the more frivolous Canterbury Tales, pre-emptively casting Chaucer’s text within a didactic framework that begins with Lydgate’s moral interpretation of the matter of Thebes and ends with the Parson’s sermon. In reflecting this reading

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
The literature of pietists (Ashkenazic hasidim)
Simha Goldin

advice in the book), who perceives that parents are attempting in every possible way to return their converted son to Judaism, advises the parents not to attempt to bring him back. The Sage knows that the youth intends to persuade his brothers and sisters to follow the same evil path, and he also knows that when he was among Jews he caused them to eat non-kosher food (‘he threw treif meat into the pot’). In other words, the Jewishness of the convert was blemished even before his conversion to Christianity, casting doubt upon Goldin, Apostasy and Jewish identity

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe