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James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate

The 1965 debate at Cambridge University between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr., posed the question: “Has the American Dream been achieved at the Expense of the American Negro?” Within the contours of the debate, Baldwin and Buckley wrestled with the ghosts of settler colonialism and slavery in a nation founded on freedom and equality. Framing the debate within the longue durée, this essay examines the deep cultural currents related to the American racial paradox at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Underscoring the changing language of white resistance against black civil rights, the essay argues that the Baldwin and Buckley debate anticipated the ways the U.S. would address racial inequality in the aftermath of the civil rights era and the dawn of neoliberalism in the 1970s.

James Baldwin Review

The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs is an exciting, new open access journal hosted jointly by The Humanitarian Affairs Team at Save the Children UK, and Centre de Réflexion sur l’Action et les Savoirs Humanitaires MSF (Paris) and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the University of Manchester. It will contribute to current thinking around humanitarian governance, policy and practice with academic rigour and political courage. The journal will challenge contributors and readers to think critically about humanitarian issues that are often approached from reductionist assumptions about what experience and evidence mean. It will cover contemporary, historical, methodological and applied subject matters and will bring together studies, debates and literature reviews. The journal will engage with these through diverse online content, including peer reviewed articles, expert interviews, policy analyses, literature reviews and ‘spotlight’ features.

Our rationale can be summed up as follows: the sector is growing and is facing severe ethical and practical challenges. The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs will provide a space for serious and inter-disciplinary academic and practitioner exchanges on pressing issues of international interest.

The journal aims to be a home and platform for leading thinkers on humanitarian affairs, a place where ideas are floated, controversies are aired and new research is published and scrutinised. Areas in which submissions will be considered include humanitarian financing, migrations and responses, the history of humanitarian aid, failed humanitarian interventions, media representations of humanitarianism, the changing landscape of humanitarianism, the response of states to foreign interventions and critical debates on concepts such as resilience or security.

divides of languages but also to allow deeper ethical engagement: an ethics of exchange ( O’Mathúna and Hunt, 2019 ). Writing about the act of translation, Ricoeur articulated the concept of linguistic hospitality as an ‘act of inhabiting the word of the Other, paralleled by the act of receiving the word of the Other into one’s own home, one’s own dwelling’ ( 2007 : xvi). Humanitarian aid entails overcoming distances

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

This article discusses how Armenians have collected, displayed and exchanged the bones of their murdered ancestors in formal and informal ceremonies of remembrance in Dayr al-Zur, Syria – the final destination for hundreds of thousands of Armenians during the deportations of 1915. These pilgrimages – replete with overlapping secular and nationalist motifs – are a modern variant of historical pilgrimage practices; yet these bones are more than relics. Bone rituals, displays and vernacular memorials are enacted in spaces of memory that lie outside of official state memorials, making unmarked sites of atrocity more legible. Vernacular memorial practices are of particular interest as we consider new archives for the history of the Armenian Genocide. The rehabilitation of this historical site into public consciousness is particularly urgent, since the Armenian Genocide Memorial Museum and Martyr’s Church at the centre of the pilgrimage site were both destroyed by ISIS (Islamic State in Syria) in 2014.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
James Baldwin and Fritz Raddatz

When James Baldwin in No Name in the Street discusses the case of Tony Maynard, who had been imprisoned in Hamburg in 1967, he emphasizes that his efforts to aid his unjustly imprisoned friend were greatly supported by his German publishing house Rowohlt and, in particular, by his then-editor Fritz Raddatz (1931–2015). While the passages on Maynard remain the only instance in Baldwin’s published writings in which Raddatz—praised as a courageous “anti-Nazi German” and a kindred ally who “knows what it means to be beaten in prison”—is mentioned directly, the relation between Baldwin and Raddatz has left traces that cover over fifty years. The African-American writer and Rowohlt’s chief editor got to know each other around 1963, when Baldwin was first published in Germany. They exchanged letters between 1965 and 1984, and many of Raddatz’s critical writings from different periods—the first piece from 1965, the last from 2014—focus of Baldwin’s books. They also collaborated on various projects—among them a long interview and Baldwin’s review of Roots—which were all published in the German weekly newspaper Die Zeit, where Raddatz served as head of the literary and arts sections from 1977 to 1985. Drawing on published and unpublished writings of both men, this article provides a discussion of the most significant facets of this under-explored relationship and its literary achievements. Thereby, it sheds new light on two central questions of recent Baldwin scholarship: first, the circumstances of production and formation crucial to Baldwin’s writings of the 1970s and 1980s, and secondly, Baldwin’s international activities, his transcultural reception and influence.

James Baldwin Review
Editors’ Introduction

, they maintain that linguistic exchange should be conceptualised, not merely as transactional, but through an ethic of exchange that is equipped to acknowledge the inherent asymmetry between those who require and those who provide assistance during a crisis. Relatedly, they argue that language and barriers to understanding can reproduce the epistemic privileges inherent to humanitarian aid, and so they call for translation processes that practise epistemic humility. Sandvik interrogates the private sector

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts

implications for how we think about the nature of aid, participation and accountability. In The Gift Marel Mauss explored how reciprocal exchanges of objects between groups build relationships between humans ( Mauss, 1990 ). A significant body of scholarship has explored aid as ‘gift exchanges’. This article moves beyond seeing aid as symbolic violence or a source of asymmetric power differences, suggesting that digital humanitarian goods represent a new form of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

result, he was immediately able to send the kidnappers a consistent message, inform the families, reach out to organisations with experience in similar situations and contact the governor of the province to request his intervention. Both victims were released that same evening. A few days later we got the vehicle back, too. All that without giving anything in exchange. The response to the incident in Yemen was exceptional. In most of my field visits

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction

humanitarian situations ( Champy, 2018 ). The precursors to these studies included those of Mark Duffield, who in a seminal article denounced the ‘bunkerisation’ of NGOs ( Duffield, 2010 ) and then, alongside Sarah Collinson and others, the ‘paradoxes of presence’ ( Collinson et al ., 2013 ). However, the exchange of field practices remains limited and the academic and policy critique of security practices does not seem to have had the impact it warrants. It is largely to this gap in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

/Overseas Development Institute . DuBois , M. ( 2010 ), ‘ Protection: Fig-Leaves and Other Delusions ’, Humanitarian Exchange , 46 , 2 – 4 . Duffield , M. ( 2012 ), ‘ Challenging Environments: Danger, Resilience and the Aid Industry ’, Security Dialogue , 43 : 5 , 475 – 92 , doi: 10.1177/0967010612457975 . Edwards

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs