Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for :

  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
  • Open access x
Clear All
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts
Markku Hokkanen

and exchanges that took place within the realms of medicine and public health between the colonial administration (particularly its medical department) and the British missions of Livingstonia, Blantyre and the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa (UMCA). 5 In his assessment of the early colonial medical service in Malawi, Colin Baker presents a generally sympathetic account of an under

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Looking beyond the state
Anna Greenwood

to be more regularly explored. Examination of the interconnectivities of the different British territories replaced the narrow focus on separate territories of Empire, which was newly recognised as a series of highly complicated networks, with people, ideas and practices all regularly exchanged between its different parts. 36 These fresh insights had the effect of moving scholars

in Beyond the state
Matthew M. Heaton

psychiatric theories that emphasised the psychological threats of cross-cultural exchange, returning mentally ill migrants to the geographical spaces where they ‘belonged’ was itself a means to a therapeutic end. Elder Dempster was therefore a role player in the medical infrastructure of the British Empire, just as it was in the facilitation of administrative and commercial networks. The second section of the

in Beyond the state
Charles V. Reed

facets of European culture. 18 Over the course of his reign Moshoeshoe paid tribute to the feared king of the Zulu, Shaka, with cattle and ostrich feathers and avoided conflict with later Zulu kings in the same manner; he also fended off attacks by the Nguni-speaking Amangwane and by the Amandebele, to whom he offered cattle as gifts in exchange for their retreat. 19 By the

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
John Marriott

the rhythms of economic exchange, and a tendency to naturalize the frightening sense of change associated with London’. 7 Remote from patronage and establishment, subject to the vicissitudes of the publishing market, the liminal status of these authors made possible experiential modes of inquiry into previously unexplored areas of London life. Marginalized and subordinate realms

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom
Alison Donnell

‘creolised the metropole’. Her story cannot invoke the familiar images and narratives of shared crossings, of boats, railway stations and landladies. Rather its telling demands that we extend our history of this creolisation backwards, to account for the smaller but significant places of exchange and encounter between West Indians, Africans and Indians in Britain, such as the Florence Mills café in Oxford

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Sabine Clarke

and establish factories in the British Caribbean. The relocation of industry producing industrial alcohol from Britain to the British West Indies seemed an obvious way to establish new colonial factories. Before the outbreak of the Second World War, molasses produced in the Caribbean was shipped to Britain by the United Molasses Company (UM) in its fleet of tankers, the Athel Line, before distillation into alcohol by the Distillers Company Ltd (DCL). 5 The relationship between UM and DCL was a close one and they exchanged shares and directors

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
‘If they treat the Indians humanely, all will be well’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

their villages and a good school house, which might serve as a place of worship till a Church could be built’. 15 Thirteen years later the Protestant missionary to the Mi’kmaq assured the Nova Scotia legislature that local bands ‘appeared’ willing to hand over most of their land in exchange for assistance in farming the remainder for their own support. ‘It seems neither wise nor just’, he concluded

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
One or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

, Maori tribal groups were organised politically, glorified the warrior, and had for decades experimented with European weapons. On behalf of the British Crown, Hobson signed the Treaty of Waitangi with numerous Maori chiefs in February 1840, by which the British believed Maori had conceded sovereignty in exchange for the rights and privileges of British subjects and the protection of their lands and

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Science and industrial development: lessons from Britain’s imperial past
Sabine Clarke

chemistry, research groups such as that headed by Norman Haworth at Birmingham University had a long history of acting as consultants to firms such as ICI and Glaxo. Students left the Chemistry Department at Birmingham and joined industry, or formed their own companies, and it seems highly likely that the most important way in which university–business contacts were deepened and maintained was through this employment of students who facilitated the exchange of knowledge and techniques between their old teachers and the firms they worked for. In Britain’s colonies

in Science at the end of empire