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Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

narrative emerges in these flows of communication? The comparatively firm structure, dramaturgical simplicity, dramatic 14 The Swedish Broadcasting Commission, decision of 11 June 2012, reg. no. 12/00116. 124Exposed content, and drastically presented main characters of the story link it to an older narrative tradition. Is it a modern fairy tale or a tall tale? There are features indicating a connection to both of these genres within folklore, but most of all the story gradually seems to have taken on the form of an urban legend. Unlike the fairy tale, this type of

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
Author: Yulia Karpova

The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Royal weddings and the media promotion of British fashion
Jo Stephenson

question is the peculiar combination of fairy-tale references and a growing accessibility of the British royal family as presented by the media – a necessary element in persuading audiences that a royal lifestyle is achievable through consumption. TIME, PLACE AND THE ‘EVENT’ In a discussion of British fashion promotion it is important to look at the presentation of fashion ‘moments

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Open Access (free)
witchcraft continued
Willem de Blécourt and Owen Davies

for her chapter on Finnish witchcraft. Retribution in cases of bewitchment ‘tended to assume the form of counter-sorcery rather than physical violence’. There was ‘no need’ to cause bodily harm. Elsewhere, folklore material does occasionally reveal violent unwitchments, but the bulk, however, show non-violent reactions. This material concerns not so much narratives, stories with a clear structure such as fairy tales, but

in Witchcraft Continued
The poetics of sustainability and the politics of what we’re sustaining
Matthew Griffiths

’s adoption of the collective voice, ‘we’, suggests how complicit we all are in this process: it becomes something with which we can identify. By sustaining this cultural introspection in ‘Belief System’, Graham sees through it to what it in turn sustains: ‘Thinking was the habitation of a / trembling colony, a fairy tale—of waiting, love—of / the capacity for / postponement—’. First, here, is the intimation of how precarious our civilisation is – ‘a / trembling colony’ that we inhabit. But this is followed by the ‘fairy tale’ the ‘colony’ tells itself, and while ‘fairy

in Literature and sustainability
Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia
Jane Landman

fertility, Elizabeth combined tradition and a promise of the new, the ‘everyday’ femininity of wife and mother, and that of fairy-tale princess privilege. She was, at once, Queen of the ‘free world’ of Commonwealth and of Empire, and she came bringing messages of unity in ‘troubled times’. 13 This chapter concerns the interactions of the tour and national public communications agencies in the production of

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

significant did he judge them to be. ‘Superficially insignificant stories’, writes Weiss of the early fairy-tales, ‘are actually latent expressions of Ford’s inner “story”, of his fascination with the anima’ (Fairy Tale and Romance in the Works of Ford Madox Ford, Lanham, MD, University Press of America, 1984, p. 9). Later texts, as I have been arguing, also fulfil this function. Gay, The Bourgeois Experience, Vol. II, The Tender Passion (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1986), p. 139. Introduction 19 81 Sigmund Freud, ‘Creative Writers and Day-Dreaming’, SE ix, p. 143

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

public action gain expressional superiority over the private, and feminine, knowledge of the other existence, the crisis, the fear and the weakness. Ellida recognises the dichotomy. She has said ‘I never saw such misery’ (p. 21) as Pauline was driven away. She gives Grimshaw the chance to be different, and he rejects it, for the fear of the unknown is far greater than the sadness at Pauline’s loss. A Call is not a realistic novel. It is a fantasy novel, dedicated to pursuing a series of dramatic, what Arnold Bennett called ‘fairy-tale’,28 scenes, in which characters

in Fragmenting modernism