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Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

This book has suggested that early modern playwrights are preoccupied with processes of making, unmaking and remaking in light of the transgressive implications of ‘finish’. The resulting emphasis on unfinished processes of construction in plays speaks strongly to the notion of early modern drama as ‘an art of incompletion: a form of display that flaunts the limits of

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

the ‘picture’ as an inanimate, motionless, ‘fixed’ object. In this view I build on Jonathan Gil Harris’s useful discussion of physical objects as distinct forms that assume ‘a synchronic temporal framework in the shape of a historical moment’. 43 Harris points out that, in contrast, matter has been understood by both Aristotle and Marx ‘as a sensuous, workable potentiality

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Divine destruction in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Chloe Porter

If early modern image-makers and spectators did not have a fully formed notion of ‘completeness’, how exactly did they understand works which were defaced, ruined or destroyed? At various points in this book I have considered iconoclasm as a productive mode of interacting with spectacle in which ‘new’ images are produced as a result of image-breaking. Does this

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Steve Sohmer

Geneva Bible (1599) begins, ‘The Lord is my shepherd, I shal not want. He maketh me to rest in grene pasture, & leadeth me by the still waters.’ So Falstaff died: Between 12 midnight and 1a.m. At the turning of the tide. Having muttered the Twenty-Third Psalm. I will demonstrate that these three details form a precise epitome of the death of William

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Chloe Porter

, paintings in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries were to some extent ‘thought of as forms of surface and wall-cladding’. 3 For example, active in the early seventeenth century, Rowland Buckett was a painter whose ‘forte lay in decorative painting’ but was also expert in ‘gilding, joinery, and carving’. 4 Examples of his work survive, such as his decorations of a chamber

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

aesthetic value and form are mediated via the image of the woman-as-other. Moreover, the more we emphasise the extent to which Hermione’s image enables deconstructive resistance to formal ‘finish’ in Shakespeare’s play, the more we invoke the ideal of an aesthetic ‘whole’. In these observations, I build on Barbara Johnson’s incisive discussion of the persistence of concepts of

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Steve Sohmer

formulated by the author, literary critic, and serial rapist George Puttenham (1529–90). In The Arte of English Poesie (1589), he laid down the rules of the game based on transposing the letters of a word (or phrase) to form another: One other pretie conceit we will impart vnto you and then trouble you with no more ... the posie

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

for writers – playwrights particularly – who openly flaunted topicality. As Annabel Patterson notes in Censorship and Interpretation , ‘governments fear the theater more than other forms of literature because of its capacity to stir up public opinion’ 3 – presumably because books and other documents tend to be read in private, and the

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

Widow , also known as The Puritan or The Widow of Watling Street and first performed in 1606, the foolish Edmond is persuaded that he is ‘invisible’ when a wand is waved ‘this, and thus, and again’ over his head. 12 Elsewhere, invisibility is frequently referred to as a mode of disguise; always, in these allusions, the means by which one might become unseen form a part of the dialogue. In

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Steve Sohmer

surprised into sonneteering by some real-life experience. Ever since the edition of Sonnets in 1837 by James Boaden ... scholars have pursued possible personal illusions.’ 11 Professor Duncan-Jones seems to infer that Shakespeare’s ‘fair youth’ and dark lady are literary creations which leapt full-formed from poet’s imagination. But, really, can this be so

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind