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Anastasia Karlsson
,
Håkan Lundström
, and
Jan-Olof Svantesson

of syllable-initial consonants in tonogenesis. Syllable reduplication and prolongation A special kind of syllable reduplication, where the vowel of the base syllable is repeated, often occurs in recitation and song but not normally in speech. The reduplicated vowel may be short or long, sometimes longer than the vowel of the base syllable. Prolongation of the vowel or of a final sonorant is also common. Occurrences of reduplication and prolongation are genre-dependent. Syllable

in In the borderland between song and speech
Siri G. Tuttle
and
Håkan Lundström

, but the language as a whole is not classed as tonal. In both Minto Tanana and Koyukon, intonation provides most of the pitch patterns in speech. Minto has a stress pattern in spoken language that makes word roots and certain vowels more prominent: in musical settings, the rhythm of words is sometimes subordinated to the musical rhythm. However, this depends on the genre. In those we will examine in this chapter, most words carry the rhythm you would hear if they were spoken. However, certain important words

in In the borderland between song and speech
Open Access (free)
The right to imagine Mapuche Pop
Puelpan

childhood and even up to the present time. Here I am referring to, by far, the most seductive, capitalist and neoliberal (almost always banal and contrived) of all the musical genres on the face of the earth: pop. Almost inevitably, the word ‘contradiction’ – in capital letters and with exclamation marks – came to my mind. However, it was not my wish to interfere with the flow of ideas or music, which, from my perspective, should always manifest itself as it comes. Other genres that have been

in Performing the jumbled city
Open Access (free)
Method, results, and implications
Håkan Lundström
and
Jan-Olof Svantesson

situations involving social or communal interaction; specific vocal expressions for situations involving the spiritual world. This is demonstrated by the Kammu material, which contains a number of genres of vocal expressions, each related to a specific spiritual context, a specific social context, a specific time and/or a specific geographical context such as a village, fields, or a forest [3–10]. 1 The very general nature of these functions indicates that instantaneous re-creation of vocal

in In the borderland between song and speech
Open Access (free)
Singing or speaking or both?
Håkan Lundström
and
Jan-Olof Svantesson

of composition in oral contexts. 7 In the English language, concepts like ‘song’, ‘declamation’, ‘recitation’, ‘incantation’, and ‘chant’ are – without being exactly defined – normally used to distinguish different genres of vocal performance. In a similar manner, many cultures use different names for more or less distinctly different forms of expression. In some cases, these different forms are quite clearly defined. In the Kammu language, spoken by an ethnic group in northern Laos, for instance

in In the borderland between song and speech
Open Access (free)
Corpse-work in the prehistory of political boundaries
Richard Kernaghan

resonance or echo they set in motion. What they invoked was not merely a general commandment against stealing. They seemed to allude to a well-known maxim that the Shining Path had frequently laid on the dead bodies of its victims so as to convert them into criminal types and thereby serve notice to all who came upon them: ‘This is how thieves die …’ ‘Así mueren los rateros …’ With messages like this, Maoist insurgents transformed corpses into a means of rural governance. Though the warning on the crates indirectly referenced a regional genre of political threat, there

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Recorded memories and diasporic identity in the archive of Giuseppe Chiaffitella
Nicola Scaldaferri

creation of preconceptions as much as they were creating communities. Many records of southern Italian music, for example, were full of references to the Sicilian Mafia (Fugazzotto 2010 ). The importance of musical practices and sound recordings for maintaining identities in diasporic communities is even more crucial wherever the connection with the country of origin is less clearly defined and the imaginary component is more pronounced. A good example is provided by Shelemay in her work on Syrian Jews: it is a musical genre, the Pizmon, that is crucial to preserving a

in Sonic ethnography
Yasuko Nagano-Madsen
and
Håkan Lundström

Imperial court to popular tanka magazines and newspaper columns to which anybody can submit their poems. Though they have existed in writing for centuries, the oral aspect of waka/tanka is still strong, both with regard to how they are conceived and how they are orally presented. Ryūka is known from the seventeenth century onwards. It originated in the higher strata of society as poems with separate melodies that were accompanied on the three-stringed long-necked lute, sanshin . The genre spread to

in In the borderland between song and speech
Mapuche migration and joy
Martín Llancaman

diverse socio-cultural traditions that were already taking place in the lower strata of colonial Colombian society. This confluence would give shape to the emergence of cumbia as a popular genre of the Atlantic coast. (Ardito 2007 : 81) In the cumbia that arrived in Santiago – danced in sheds and parties – there was still that popular force expressed through the ‘gallop’, the predominant rhythmic characteristic of cumbia . However, it was no longer the

in Performing the jumbled city
Notes on developing a photo-ethnographic practice in Basilicata
Lorenzo Ferrarini

and brown peoples as subject (Ruby 1996 ). It makes more sense, then, to consider what constitutes photographing as an anthropologist rather than an anthropological photograph. A focus on the approach also has the benefit of avoiding scholasticism and keeping open a multitude of genres and styles that each situation and research question might call for, including those outside of realism and even outside documentary photography. Patrick Sutherland expresses himself along similar lines when considering the key aspect of photo-ethnography to be the

in Sonic ethnography