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Kerry Kidd

not only farmed babies, but killed them: she confronts Allistair with the truth, and when Mrs Allistair sees she will not be bullied into silence any longer, she pushes Viviane down the stairs and leaves her for dead. However, Viviane is saved by one of the other girls, returning early from an evening outing; she survives, a nurse caring for her hears her story and in the last minutes of the film Mrs

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Melanie Williams

J EAN-LUC GODARD once remarked that all you need to make a film is ‘a girl and a gun’ and the opening sequence of Yield to the Night (J. Lee Thompson, 1956) looks like a textbook illustration of his axiom. The girl is Mary Hilton, played by Diana Dors, who whips out the gun from her handbag and promptly shoots the woman she holds responsible for her lover’s suicide. As a result

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Serious Charge and film censorship
Tony Aldgate

too liable to believe anything about the parson. A village girl, pregnant by the local bad lad, comes to the vicar for advice and on her way out sees his maid in the arms of her seducer. She flings herself under a car and is killed. The vicar has discovered that Larry Thompson is the man and sends for him to tell him he is morally guilty of the girl’s death and to warn him to mend his ways. Larry is

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

teenagers in the 1930s, particularly stars of gangster films such as James Cagney. For Bill, this even led to being able to recreate film star lifestyle at the cinema with a girl: ‘You in your James Cagney outfit, she in her Joan Blondell dress, you were the stars of the screen for the night.’ 14 The surroundings were crucial to his depiction of reliving film star lifestyle at the cinema – he recounts dating as

in Memory and popular film
Isabel Quigly

another in terror on a sofa, convinced that a gangster had rung up and was going to pop round at any moment. (Village girls in Sussex were then a lot less knowledgeable and cool than they are now.) Sophia Loren was friendlier than anyone might have expected, and remembered two visitors to her day’s filming well enough to ask me, years later, with what seemed like real interest, what had become of the beautiful Italian au

in British cinema of the 1950s
The Spanish Gardener and its analogues
Alison Platt

), Leslie Norman’s The Shiralee (1957) and J. Lee Thompson’s Tiger Bay (1959) all deal in varying degrees with a young girl’s relationship with her father, or father-substitute, it is also the male child’s ‘search for a satisfactory father-figure’ which most interests this era in its portrayals of child-as-hero. 5 In Michael Anderson’s Waterfront (1950) a 12-year-old boy

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

cautionary tale of ‘two other little girls and their mother who went into the woods’. The film then shows us her story. A woman and two little girls carrying baskets walk toward the camera from the rear of the frame. Two Indians suddenly appear in the right and left foreground, emerging from behind the boulder and bush where they had been hiding. The women and children turn to run but other Indians leap out

in Memory and popular film
Ian Mackillop and Neil Sinyard

. I am Professor of English Literature at the University of Sheffield. I am the author of two books on British intellectual life: F. R. Leavis: A Life in Criticism (Allan Lane, 1995) and The British Ethical Societies (Cambridge University Press, 1985), and a book about François Truffaut and Henri Pierre Roché, author of Jules and Jim and Two English Girls and the

in British cinema of the 1950s
Robert Murphy

), Violent Playground (1958) and Beat Girl (1960) (‘System as Stalemate’). Most of Powell and Pressburger’s wartime films appear alongside Asquith’s The Demi-Paradise (1943), Hitchcock’s The Skin Game (1931) and Lean’s Great Expectations (1946) in ‘The Nine Lives of Colonel Blimp’; the post-war films turn up in ‘Between Two Worlds’ where Powell is classified as a romantic

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

. The theme of emptiness is reinforced at the end of the film, both by the blowing of the radiator hose and in the lifting helicopter shot. I recall that the production did not get any positive coverage from the local paper in Phoenix. As to why U Turn didn’t find its audience, I think that certainly one reason was to do with not getting to Cannes. That really hurt us. The film had a terrible opening weekend. It opened against Kiss the Girls [Gary Fleder, 1997], which was an entertaining murder story. I also have the sense that Mike Medavoy, who didn’t like the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone