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The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire
Author: Katie Pickles

Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900 and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender and imperial history, and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Chapters focus upon the IODE's attempts to create a British Canada through its maternal feminist work in education, health, welfare and citizenship. In addition, the book reflects on the IODE's responses to threats to Anglo-Canadian hegemony posed by immigration, World Wars and Communism, and examines the complex relationship between imperial loyalty and settler nationalism. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

Open Access (free)
Global Britishness and settler cultures in South Africa and New Zealand
Charles V. Reed

Goosen christened the town he founded Prince Alfred’s Hamlet. These examples reflect the ways that royal visitors were appropriated into local mythologies of imperial identity and citizenship. The royal tours also demonstrate that imperial and national identities were mutually dependent rather than exclusive. The nationalist histories of the settlement colonies tend to frame the

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

the imperial past and ideas that were seen as increasingly redundant in modern Canadian society. Such adaptation is applicable on a wider scale to the other former ‘white dominions’ or ‘settler societies’ of the British Empire, which have also developed national identities out of their imperial pasts, simultaneously fostering an attachment to the British Commonwealth. In its relationship to the Empire

in Female imperialism and national identity
Organizing principles, 1900–1919
Katie Pickles

identity was constructed through the active silencing of the disruptive relations of ethnicity, gender and of class’. Rather than reconstituting she attempts to destabilize Englishness, uncovering contingency in its historic specificity, and looking at the dependences, inequalities and oppressions which were hidden in its celebration of national identity. 8 In considering ‘contingency’, ‘historic

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

meaning of the mountie to represent changing Anglo-Canadian nationalism. 13 Also concerned with icons, Daniel Francis takes a critical look at national identity through an examination of ‘myths’ in Canadian history such as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), and the myth of unity with Quebec. 14 The shaping of Canadian culture, history, politics and health

in Female imperialism and national identity
John Marriott

radical critiques of the existing order using conveniently remote locations. Thus representations of foreign lands and peoples were used allegorically to address a host of pressing domestic issues around national identity, the constitution, the distribution of power and individual liberty. More generally, the seventeenth century witnessed a critical stage in the transition from narratives of pilgrimage and

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples
Katie Pickles

countries’. 14 In this context, immigration became of less importance to the IODE than it had been, and national identity became a more secure and important part of the IODE’s representation of Canadian identity. By focusing on Canadian citizens themselves, and on the spaces of Canada from a North American geographical standpoint, the IODE focused more intensively on indigenous peoples, made a call for

in Female imperialism and national identity
Charles V. Reed

effectively usurped by the educated respectables of South Africa’s burgeoning urban communities. The significant exception to this decline and growing dependency of hereditary elites in the context of British imperial culture, were those political traditions that were able to resist colonial appropriation by nurturing their own proto-national identities. 203

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
War memorials, memory and imperial knowledge
Katie Pickles

the structure of history as a discipline. 2 For my particular purposes, how war is remembered is important as it can reveal much about imperial and national identity, patriotism and citizenship. 3 Whereas early work on war and memory, in particular Paul Fussell’s 1975 The Great War and Modern Memory , argued for the disruptive effects of war and the dawning of new eras, recent interpretations

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Charles V. Reed

’, National Identities 2 (July 2000): 109–25; Richard Williams, The Contentious Crown: Public Discussion of the British Monarchy in the Reign of Queen Victoria (Brookfield, VT, 1997); Andrzej Olechnowicz, ed., The Monarchy and the British Nation, 1780 to the Present (Cambridge, 2007 ). 6 Walter Bagehot’s distinction between

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911