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What can curiosity-driven public engagement activities contribute to dialogues about animal research?
Emma Roe
,
Sara Peres
, and
Bentley Crudgington

, before discussing how we have been inspired by other performance art, and how MX facilitators generate talk during the activity. We then move to discuss particular aspects of the infrastructure around an MX Workshop – the biobank, the passport, the ear-punch, the Infinity Box, and the caging system – and what these can add to the activity. We conclude by reflecting on how the MX helps move beyond deficit-model approaches to public engagement around animal research, instead offering a valuable creative, curiosity

in Researching animal research
Emma Roe
,
Bella Lear
, and
Louise Mackenzie

the purpose and value of consumer labelling, who benefits from it, and the role such labels play in decision-making. In ‘Building participation through fictional worlds’ ( Chapter 16 ), performance art was used to allow groups of public audiences to experience the deliberations and decisions made by an Animal Welfare Ethical Review Body (AWERB) in a way that completely changed their access to, and experience of, the discussions. Researchers were able to create a new type of ethical review, embedded in a

in Researching animal research
More-than-human microbial methods on the bus
Charlotte Veal
,
Paul Hurley
,
Emma Roe
, and
Sandra Wilks

research. Routes to Safety amalgamated knowledges and practices from microbiology, geography, landscape architecture and performance art, and methods spanning scientific, social and creative techniques – including swabbing, interviews, ethnography and filmmaking. None of these methods were innovative in and of themselves but what was valuable in the context of the pandemic was the mutually informative process

in Knowing COVID- 19
Nazima Kadir

performance art pieces. Gerard used his authority as the only person who originally squatted the house in a way that the Dutch classify as “anti-social.” In addition to his own room, he took over the living room as his private study, often borrowed money from Allen without paying him back, stole bikes from his non-squatter neighbors, and stole from the private rooms of his housemates, understanding that no one dared to confront him. Gerard holds a more extreme opinion from his fellow squatters because he

in The autonomous life?