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Christopher Morgan

‘ultimate reality’, again, a ‘religious truth’ clearly unconfined by traditional religious dogma. In answering the third question concerning the nature of the relation between religion and poetry Thomas’s answer is implicit in the foregoing responses: the relation between religion and poetry is, for Thomas, clearly organic. The individual’s subjective experience of ultimate reality itself becomes the natural stuff of poetry. Indeed, according to his own definitions, to cast off the ‘religious frame’ chapter6 28/1/05 1:33 pm Page 154 154 Expanding deity for poetry

in R. S. Thomas
Open Access (free)
Corruption, community and duty in Family Matters
Peter Morey

Rohinton Mistry law’s earnest yet aggressive bedside devotions in the disturbing scene in which Yezad’s prayers and Daisy’s music seem to do battle over the mute, prostrate elder (FM, 433–5). Formally, the concern for past-present connections is played out through repetitions: Yezad comes to repeat Nariman’s father’s inflexible religious dogma; Murad’s non-Parsi girlfriend threatens a repeat of the parental estrangement of the earlier generation; and, at one point, Yezad unfairly accuses Roxana of neglecting the rest of her family in favour of her father, paralleling

in Rohinton Mistry
Rousseau’s and nationalism
Mads Qvortrup

is needed to acquire that societal unity, patriotism and those civic virtues which are necessary for the maintenance of a healthy society, is not a metaphysical creed but a civic ‘cult with love of laws’, which teaches the citizens ‘that service done to the State is service done to a tutular god (III, 465). The alternative to Machiavelli’s religious cult is secular version of the same, that is, a ‘purely civic profession of faith of which the sovereign should fix articles, not exactly as religious dogmas, but as social sentiments without which man cannot be a good

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Mary Warnock, embryos and moral expertise
Duncan Wilson

argued that permitting embryo research ‘involved people sitting in judgement on another’s life and treating that life as a mere means to an end, which undermined the basic dignity of human beings’.152 Opponents of research, which also included anti-abortion groups and the Women’s Institute, notably stressed that their stance was not anti-science or based simply on religious dogma. For the Guild of Catholic Doctors, it was supported by the fact that ‘as any microgeneticist will tell you, whether or not more individuals result, the genetic coding is laid down on

in The making of British bioethics