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Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

they were described. Just so did Mozart's Don Giovanni and Leporello by exchanging clothes enable Giovanni to evade his pursuers. But dressing as someone else has its perils. In Eisenstein's Ivan the Terrible it was by flattering the conspirators’ candidate for the throne into wearing the royal robes that the tzar diverted the assassin's knife to the usurper whose cause it was meant to advance. 13 In an age without photography, film, television, or the Internet, faces were unknown beyond an immediate circle, while clothes proclaimed a king. Renaissance theatre is

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

– whether as fiction, poetry, painting, sculpture, music, or film – can often express or indicate what bare theory can only point at from a great distance. Cultivation provides, too, an alternative description to an account of people as trapped in a choice between intentionality, where everything that is done is part of a plan, and spontaneity, where actions burst suddenly from nowhere. The irresolvable paradoxes of cultivated identity and the possibilities of autonomy, action, and choice Feathers are part of the bird. But the bird's plumage will change only with the

in Cultivating political and public identity
Nazima Kadir

campaign and allocated tasks, Frank often became upset, arguing that he felt silenced and excluded. Both women learned to appease Frank by immediately apologizing, patiently listening to his ideas, and then continuing with their earlier discussion once he felt comfortable. Frank is a Dutch squatter in his late twenties. Trained as a filmmaker, he works during the summer, filming music festivals around Europe, and lives off his summer salary during the rest of the year. Unusually for squatters, Frank grew up in

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

bearing. By the middle of the twentieth century, photography, cinema, and television meant that the face was as important, and the proclamation of rank or profession by clothing was of declining relevance. Whilst the privileged and the powerful still proclaimed and cultivated their status by clothing and cars, much presentation became a statement of allegiance or membership, rather than of what Veblen called the invidious distinction of superior wealth. As a mobilised society became more democratic and the formal distance between elite and mass

in Cultivating political and public identity