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Missions, the colonial state and constructing a health system in colonial Tanganyika

of Christianity, commerce and civilisation that the Livingstonean and Victorian imaginations of missionary enterprise had envisaged. But if by the 1910s and 1920s they had become, in effect, part of the mix of service providers, they could not be said to constitute a ‘sector’ in the sense of a collective identity, shared values and objectives and common interests. Reflecting the history of the

in Beyond the state

concerned with helping mothers within these local communities; certainly they were by the far the largest groups cited in the ZMA’s annual reports as using its midwives. 62 Even this provision was sometimes contested, however, with various religious and ethnic subgroups of the Arab and Indian communities sporadically complaining that funds were not being targeted at the specific communities for which they had been

in Beyond the state
The short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa

53 Charles Eliot, 1905, quoted in Gregory, India and East Africa , p. 46 54 Bruce Berman and John Lonsdale, Unhappy Valley: Conflict in Kenya and Africa, Book 1: State and Class , London, James Currey, 1991, p. 34; B.M. Du Toit, The Boers in East Africa: Ethnicity and Identity

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)

the IODE in historical context, revealing its substantial contribution in the making of an Anglo-Canadian identity in the image of Britain. At a first glance the IODE appears as one of the many women’s philanthropic organizations that emerged from the second part of the nineteenth century onwards. With an increase in the status given to what was deemed women’s ‘natural’ work of

in Female imperialism and national identity

imperial citizenship to non-cooperation and contestation, reflect the changing nature of imperial politics for local peoples. The second half of the nineteenth century was a transitional period in the history of the British Empire, when notions of imperial identity and citizenship came to dominate (however briefly) the cultural and political landscape of imperial culture. This is not to

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Global Britishness and settler cultures in South Africa and New Zealand

Populi’ (‘voice of the people’), complained that seats in the gallery of the Provincial Council, ‘ public property ’, were being sold for ‘half-a-guinea each’. 8 Elites’ ability to control the symbolic space of the royal visit was openly and loudly contested by another British political tradition: radical and public protest. In the empire, the narrative of the royal tour was

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)

, appropriated and contested. In this context, subjects of empire provincialised the British Isles, centring the colonies in their political and cultural constructions of empire, Britishness, citizenship, and loyalty. The Victorian and Edwardian British Empire was a space of political imagination and cultural creativity where imperial politics and cultures were forged not only by colonial administrators and

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Organizing principles, 1900–1919

. Examining the preference for British immigrants, this chapter shows how, as was the case with other ethnic labels, ‘Britishness’ was very much an invented tradition. During the early years of the twentieth century women’s place was often ideally located as a wife, mother or daughter in private domestic space. The IODE was involved in utilizing such maternal identity in the

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom

accounts of West Indian and black British literary and intellectual histories of the first half of the twentieth century is mention of Una Marson, a black Jamaican woman whose experiences and achievements provided a link to all these major movements and figures. It is perhaps not surprising that Marson’s identity as an intellectual is not straightforward. As an educated, middle-class daughter of a Baptist

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain

Canada, where she resided, and fan outwards to the other parts of the Empire, including Britain. After a period of fervent writing of national histories, scholars are now exploring the connections, tensions and ironies between national and imperial identities. Benedict Anderson’s work has been instrumental in destabilizing the absolute power ascribed to empires by suggesting that they were ‘imagined

in Female imperialism and national identity