Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • religious congregation x
  • Manchester Religious Studies x
  • Open access x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
French clerical reformers and episcopal status
Alison Forrestal

seventeenthcentury figure may be termed the founder of the theology of priesthood, it is Cardinal Pierre de Bérulle (1575–1629), on whom all later writers on priesthood and reforming activists drew heavily. His reflections culminated in the formation in 1611, of the Congregation of the Oratory, a company of dedicated secular priests who would correspond to their founder’s notion of the clerical vocation. When Bérulle died in 1629, the Oratory numbered approximately four hundred members, housed in over sixty locations and overseeing many students training for the priesthood in

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Open Access (free)
The revolt of democratic Christianity and the rise of public opinion
S.J. Barnett

Jansénisme à la laïcité et les origines de la déchristianisation (Paris: Editions de la Maison des Sciences de L’Homme, 1987). Conventicles: independent Huguenot congregations. Doyle, Jansenism, pp. 30, 39. Van Kley, The Religious Origins of the French Revolution, p. 248. McManners, Church and Society in Eighteenth-Century France, vol. 2, pp. 364, 377. Doyle, Jansenism, pp. 50–1. McManners, Church and Society in Eighteenth-Century France, vol. 2, p. 428. On the Parlement of Paris and Jansenism see also J. Swann, Politics and the Parlement of Paris under Louis XV, 1754

in The Enlightenment and religion
A case study in the construction of a myth
S.J. Barnett

The English deist movement 3 The English deist movement: a case study in the construction of a myth The essence of this chapter is that it is not possible to understand the development of the myth of the English deist movement without grasping the politico-religious context of late-seventeenth- and early-eighteenth-century England and the growing role of public opinion and opinion-makers within it. Some preliminary remarks on the major elements of the politico-religious configuration of late Tudor and Stuart England are therefore necessary. Post

in The Enlightenment and religion
Open Access (free)
Alison Forrestal

currently, though undeservedly, remain unfashionable in the historiography of early modern catholicism. Since the 1950s, the customary concentration on the institutional aspects of Catholic reform has been counterbalanced by a new emphasis on the ‘religion of the people’. With the welcome broadening of horizons brought by the histoire des mentalités and socio-historical methods of research, increasing attention has been paid to the religious culture of the ‘ordinary’ Christians whose lives were affected, to a greater or lesser extent, by the profound shifts in belief and

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Alison Forrestal

the archbishop of Rouen, François de Harlay de Champvallon, revoked the regulars’ sacramental and preaching privileges in his diocese. Archbishop Harlay chap 3 22/3/04 86 12:52 pm Page 86 FATHERS, PASTORS AND KINGS demanded attendance at parish mass on Sundays and feast days, and forbade religious to preach or to hold congregations and processions at this time. Regular superiors, moreover, were ordered to present their confessors to curés for their authorisation. Religious not approved in this manner would not be permitted either to confess or to communicate

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Open Access (free)
Alison Forrestal

communicate their views on the perfection of the episcopal state, its pre-eminent place within the ecclesiastical hierarchy, the existence of episcopal grace and the extensive authority of prelates, not only to the priests within their congregations but to the episcopate itself. Through informal contacts within their circle of religious associates and through formal publications their ideas passed rapidly into the episcopate to become standard elements of its self-identity. They were also quickly adopted by apologists of episcopacy among the lesser clergy, and by

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Open Access (free)
Mirrors of French ideals?
Alison Forrestal

episcopal literature, and notably within Godeau’s publications during the 1650s. He strongly endorsed the principles of the 1625 Déclaration and incorporated this attitude into his hagiographic works, by adapting the examples of Charles Borromeo and Augustine of Hippo to contemporary France. In his Vie de S. Augustin, published in 1652, Godeau examined the life and vocation of this early church bishop. In seventeenth-century France, religious caused ‘occasions of trouble and dispute’ to a degree unknown in the primitive church: ‘The auxiliaries do not wish to recognise

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Alison Forrestal

chap 4 22/3/04 12:53 pm Page 109 4 Ecclesiastical monarchy or monarchies? Why did the French episcopate prove so tenacious in opposing the regulars’ calls for independence through the seventeenth century? Like the bishops’ quarrels with the curés, these were crises of authority in which the episcopate fought to assert its disciplinary supremacy over the religious orders. Yet the struggle between the bishops and the regulars was just one manifestation of a much larger complexity: the place of the episcopate in the church’s governing hierarchy. Not only did

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Alison Forrestal

as sixteen.21 Many of these interim bishops were members of religious orders or chapters or diocesan administrators and thus experienced in ecclesiastical affairs. Yet the fact remains that the practice of confidence was an institutional abuse which allowed aristocratic control of church temporalities and a secular view of the episcopal office to be maintained. It is fair to say that the status of bishops was in this period lower than at any other time during the ancien régime. However, this assessment relates to just one aspect of the episcopal office as it was

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Elite beliefs about witchcraft and magic
Alison Rowlands

and clerics were council appointees whose religious affiliation and educational and social background had to be acceptable to the councillors for them to acquire their positions in the first place, and their advice was frequently followed by the councillors in specific witchcraft cases. It thus seems reasonable to assume that the beliefs about witchcraft they expressed in their opinions reflected a similar spectrum of beliefs held by the councillors themselves. We can also establish the broader framework of elite beliefs about beneficient witchcraft and popular use

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany