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Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

battles, its pronouncements are never objective, self-evident or universally applied ( Evans, 2013 ). Arendt’s claim that violence can be justified but never legitimate must be reversed: violence is often legitimated in political arenas and juridical courts; but it can never be justified through an invocation of justice, except where the latter is limited to a reductive juridical paradigm. Justice is not law ( Derrida, 1992 ). Justice is the ability to live a life with dignity and free from lawful violence. Justice in this regard is not the end of power. It is an

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
(Post-)structuralism between France and the United States
Edward Baring

-Strauss and Roland Barthes foregrounded anonymous structures that transcended and determined the self. Moving on at pace, so the narrative goes, these ideas were challenged by a range of post-structuralists, most prominently Jacques Derrida but also Gilles Deleuze, Luce Irigaray and Julia Kristeva. The ‘post-structuralists’ added a dash of Nietzsche to the staid structuralist mix, which tended to dissolve certainties and unsettle the structures that earlier scholars had described. Despite the attractive simplicity of

in Post-everything
Maja Zehfuss

Ferdinand de Saussure’s arguments in order to offer some thoughts on the role of naming in relation to the Kosovo conflict. Naming concerns the relationship of language and reality. Using Jacques Derrida’s thought, the second section argues that the idea of the existence of a reality, which constrains our actions, is itself a representation, which has political implications. The third section explores how

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
The no-thing that knows no name and the Beckett envelope, blissfully reconsidered
Enoch Brater

speculated on the specifically theatrical potential of ‘postmodern theatric[k]s’ in contemporary American drama. Somewhat later, critics like H. Porter Abbott would centre this discussion on Beckett. Could his work be properly situated in the broad and less contentious context of ‘late modernism’? Richard Begam went even further, describing how Beckett’s fiction anticipates many of the defining themes and ideas of Barthes, Foucault and Derrida in moving us toward ‘the end of modernity’.1 By contrast, Beebe’s authors were far more tentative in the approaches they pursued

in Beckett and nothing
Ghosts and the busy nothing in Footfalls
Stephen Thomson

phenomenology a worrying at the bounds of everyday notions of materiality, yet to refuse the transcendence and authenticity countenanced by Merleau-Ponty and Heidegger respectively. Spectrality figures in both Maude and Barfield as an expression of this suspension between metaphysical categories.58 Indeed, Barfield goes one step further to describe Beckett’s very relationship with Heidegger as ‘uncanny’.59 Jacques Derrida, when he explains why he cannot write on Beckett, produces a similar doubling of the uncanny, as theme and as relation. This brief but fascinating apology

in Beckett and nothing
Open Access (free)
Reading Beckett’s negativity
Peter Boxall

– it is as if Beckett’s writing 34 Beckett and nothing reads one back, demonstrating the vanishing point of one’s own reading practices whilst refusing to yield itself to interpretation. It is perhaps this quality, this kind of reverse interpretation, that leads to Derrida’s famous reluctance to read Beckett, to expose deconstruction to Beckett’s deconstructive gaze. Beckett is an author, Derrida says in an interview with Derek Attridge, ‘to whom I feel very close, or to whom I would like to feel myself very close; but also too close’,22 and it is precisely this

in Beckett and nothing
Andrew Bowie

of thought in language, and such questioning is common to various traditions in contemporary philosophy, connecting such differing thinkers as Derrida and Sellars (see Wheeler 2000). Schelling’s version of the issue of differentiality already pointed the way, as we saw in the comparison with Derrida in Chapter 4, to contemporary questioning of metaphysics (while also suggesting problems in some of that questioning). How, then, does Hegel fit into these versions of the idea of language, music and difference? For Hegel, the relationship between determinate content in

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

124 change and the politics of certainty 7 1 Tracing disappearance Nothing … is anywhere ever simply present or absent. There are only, everywhere, differences and traces of traces. – Jacques Derrida2 Memorial practices are especially difficult in cases of disappearance. Ordinary practices of memory don’t work, and yet memory has to be continually kept alive. Families are thrown into a deep, unresolvable crisis. When someone goes missing, relatives have to hold two contradictory thoughts in mind at the same time: the person may be dead, or, they may walk

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Jenny Edkins

, ‘filled with timeless animals’, where they are surrounded by specimens of what seems like every form of natural life, but stuffed, behind glass, or classified, in cabinets, and they talk, laugh, and move among the exhibits almost as if they are exhibits themselves.22 On each occasion, there is a certain hospitality to the other, an openness: ‘She welcomes him in a simple way.’23 The notion of simple acceptance recalls Jacques Derrida’s hospitality: ‘Let us say yes to who or what turns up, before any determination, before any anticipation, before any identification

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)
Art as the ‘organ of philosophy’
Andrew Bowie

the Other, recur in varying ways in modern philosophy.10 Most recently it has been those thinkers who, like Heidegger, Foucault and Derrida, question the nature of the subject in ‘Western metaphysics’, which is seen as being manifested precisely in philosophical systems, the commodity system and in language as a system, who have revived interest in the questions first raised by the tradition at issue in the present book. A central concern for these thinkers is the language of poetry, conceived as a counter to the objectifying language associated with the idea that

in Aesthetics and subjectivity