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A tradition of indirection
Author: Rachel E. Hile

This book examines the satirical poetry of Edmund Spenser and argues for his importance as a model and influence for younger poets writing satires in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The book focuses on reading satirical texts of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in relation to one another, with specific attention to the role that Edmund Spenser plays in that literary subsystem. The book connects key Spenserian texts in The Shepheardes Calender and the Complaints volume with poems by a range of authors in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, including Joseph Hall, Thomas Nashe, Tailboys Dymoke, Thomas Middleton, and George Wither to advance the thesis that Spenser was seen by his contemporaries as highly relevant to satire in Elizabethan England. For scholars of satire, the book offers a fuller discussion and theorization of the type of satire that Spenser wrote, “indirect satire,” than has been provided elsewhere. A theory of indirect satire benefits not just Spenser studies, but satire studies as well. For scholars of English Renaissance satire in particular, who have tended to focus on the formal verse satires of the 1590s to the exclusion of attention to more indirect forms such as Spenser’s, this book is a corrective, an invitation to recognize the importance of a style of satire that has received little attention.

Open Access (free)
Rachel E. Hile

sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in relation to one another, with specific attention to the role that Edmund Spenser plays in that literary subsystem. I aim to argue a number of points, which will be of interest to varying audiences. For Spenser scholars, who recognize Spenser’s supremacy in “serious poetry” of the period and have carefully studied his influence on epic, pastoral, and lyric poetry, my analysis of Spenser’s reputation as a satirical poet will contribute to our understanding of Spenser as “the poet’s poet.” For scholars of satire, I offer a fuller

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Rachel E. Hile

mens mouths and minds” (Nashe, Strange Newes, 282). There is a lack of theory and also a lack of continuity in the tradition, which, as I mentioned in the Introduction, gave way to more direct satire by the eighteenth century, presumably because writers came to feel more safe from censorship and prosecution. But there is no lack of evidence for a practice of indirect satire in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in England, and Edmund Spenser, a towering figure in more canonical genres of poetry by the 1590s, became for English satirists in this time

in Spenserian satire
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Theory and Spenserian practice
Rachel E. Hile

1 Indirect satire: theory and Spenserian practice In Edmund Spenser’s Prosopopoia; or, Mother Hubberds Tale, a tonal shift characterizes the final episode, in which the villainous Fox and Ape, having wreaked havoc in the three estates as husbandmen, clerics, and courtiers, go even farther by usurping royal power. The self-conscious Chaucerianism of the first episodes—summarized by Kent van den Berg as “the recreative fiction that animals are like men”—gives way to a more fully developed, and more clearly satirical, fictional world in which “men are like animals

in Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

particular situations, and thus I focus my attention on those points that provide the most help in conceptualizing the lines of influence connecting Edmund Spenser to other English satirists. Even-Zohar defines literary “interference” in a way that indicates its similarities to what is more typi- MUP_Hile_SpenserSatire_Printer.indd 65 14/10/2016 15:35 66 Spenserian satire cally called “influence”: “a relation(ship) between literatures, whereby a certain literature A (a source literature) may become a source of direct or indirect loans for another literature B (a

in Spenserian satire
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Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

In James Shirley’s St Patrick for Ireland , first performed in the Werburgh St Theatre in Dublin in 1639, the Irish prince Corybreus becomes invisible by means of a magical bracelet provided by the pagan priest Archimagus, an explicit reference to the deceitful, Catholic Archimago of Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene. 10 Corybreus uses the bracelet in a plot to rape a noblewoman named Emeria, and

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Rachel E. Hile

Middleton had a lifelong sympathy for this reform-minded Protestantism. In the 1590s, this Protestant orientation appears through Middleton’s use of objects of praise (Robert Devereux, Second Earl of Essex) and blame (William Cecil, Lord Burghley, and his son Robert Cecil) similar to those emphasized in the poetry of Edmund Spenser. By 1604, following the execution of Essex, the death of Queen Elizabeth, and the accession of King James I, the cultural expression of this religious and political alignment appears instead through connections to the City of London, as opposed

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Simon Smith, Jackie Watson, and Amy Kenny

self- MUP_Smith_Printer.indd 13 02/04/2015 16:18 14 The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660 portraits by female artists such as Sofonisba Anguissola, Tudor argues for a distinctively early modern configuration of viewing, tracing the significance of this configuration for encounters with a painting through a wide range of texts, including writings by Edmund Spenser and James Shirley. These specific understandings of visual engagement with paintings yield significant suggestions about the sensory configurations of early aesthetic encounters. August

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Negotiating vanity
Faye Tudor

‘seemed vnto hir selfe a second Narcissus’.6 Female artists who represent themselves are hampered by the mirror’s classic, symbolic associations with women which regularly portrays them in an unfavourable light. ‘She held a mirrhour bright’ In The Faerie Queene Edmund Spenser addresses the traditional emblems of vanity – the mirror and the (often naked) young woman transfixed by it – to generate a negative exemplary mirror which serves to warn: So proud she shyned in her Princely state, Looking to heauen; for earth she did disdayne, And sitting high; for lowly she did

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Natalie K. Eschenbaum

Richard de Fournival’s Bestiare d’amour (c. 1240), Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queen 2.11 (1590), George Chapman’s Ovid’s Banquet of Sence (1595), Thomas Tomkis’s play Lingua (1607) and Michael Drayton’s Idea XXIX, ‘To the Senses’ (1616). The narrator of Drayton’s sonnet, for example, calls upon each sense in his attempt to thwart Love’s attack on his heart:   But he with beauty first corrupted sight, My hearing bribed with her tongue’s harmony, My taste by her sweet lips drawn with delight, My smelling won with her breath’s spicery,   But when my touching came to play

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660