Search results

You are looking at 111 - 118 of 118 items for :

  • executive politics x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Mike Huggins

service of racing news to newspapers. The popular press of the interwar years opened up racing and its affairs to wider public view and understanding, hugely increasing and sensationalising its coverage, a point already alarming anti-betting campaigners in 1923.16 Each paper had tipsters, providing further betting information and a new lighter touch of incidents, gossip 43 44 Horseracing and the British, 1919–39 and ‘talking points’ for the ordinary reader. Despite its Liberal political slant the News Chronicle was the first morning newspaper to provide a list of

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

certain to have grave consequences for the University. It was in no position to solve its problems by laying off part of its workforce or sacking redundant executives. But the University could not afford to accumulate a deficit which it had no means of clearing away. At the end of 1973 Edward Heath’s administration withdrew guarantees that the Government would protect the finances of universities against the effects of inflation. No more would it proclaim itself ready to look with sympathy upon their plight. Anthony Barber, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, reduced

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
Open Access (free)
Teaching ‘relaxed living’ in post-war Britain
Ayesha Nathoo

the twentieth century that spanned diverse Western socio-political contexts. Yet a common explanatory framework made them therapeutically appealing to successive populations beset by ‘neurasthenia’, ‘exhaustion’, ‘nerves’ and ‘stress’. 4 Notions of balance featured predominantly in relaxation and stress discourse: therapeutic strategies were framed as a means to restore and retain bodily equilibrium, and provide a counterbalance to the mental and physical stresses of modern life. A relaxed individual would supposedly

in Balancing the self
Bonnie Evans

British sociology of the 1960s was focused on the study of everyday life and interaction, the normal population rather than the deviant classes of the previous generation of sociological investigation. As Savage has pointed out, it represented a political movement in that it sought to present a new perspective on social interaction, a new vision of society. Post-1962, British

in The metamorphosis of autism
Bonnie Evans

the instruments used to measure it. This chapter examines this radical transformation in the meaning of autism. It examines why the shift in meaning occurred by placing it into the context of legal and political changes in Britain concerning the rights of children, and the impact of these changes on the construction of scientific studies of children. The transformation of social

in The metamorphosis of autism
Open Access (free)
Servicemen
Nicholas Atkin

allegedly targeted married French sailors.113 Clearly sexual politics, and accusations of collaboration horizontale, were a means by which officials on all sides could assert moral superiority when fighting out their battles. Poor discipline among the sailors cannot be attributed solely to poor living conditions. Part of the problem lay with inadequate British supervision where barbed wire compensated for the lack of patrols. In a letter to Desmond Morton, Spears complained that ‘the chief difficulty in administering the French camps is the ineffectiveness and inadequacy

in The forgotten French
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

Trust, David Alliance being the Group Chief Executive of Coates Viyella, which had long had business interests in the region. Here the intention was not to serve the practical chap 11 23/9/03 256 1:18 pm Page 256 The 1980s needs of a particular business, industry or profession, but to enlighten and inform those who would soon become influential professional people. As Professor Hinnells promised, ‘we will produce graduates with an informed and sensitive view of Judaism. As they go on to careers in such opinion-forming professions as teaching, the media, the

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
Jane Brooks

–1947)’, Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps Association, The Gazette 3, 6 (1958): 11. 60 Susan McGann, Anne Crowther and Rona Dougall, A History of the Royal College of Nursing A Voice for Nursing, 1916–90 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009), 128. 61 It is not the intention in this chapter to provide a detailed discussion on the foundation of the NHS; there is a wealth of literature on this topic. For a full and detailed account see, for example, Charles Webster, The National Health Service: A Political History (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002

in Negotiating nursing