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Queen Victoria, photography and film at the fin de siècle
Ian Christie

Secretary, would soon become closely involved with the royal family, photographing their children in early 1854 and taking formal studies of the couple, including the well-known double portrait in court dress of 1854. Later that year, he left for the Crimea, apparently at the prompting of Prince Albert (if not the Queen herself) to photograph the war, in the hope that his record would counteract reports appearing in

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Royal weddings and the media promotion of British fashion
Jo Stephenson

was shown wearing their ‘£175 taupe Shola dress to meet the Obamas’. 4 The royal family is a central feature of Britain’s projected identity and a unique selling point of the national brand created to promote its exports. The relationship between the Windsors and the fashion industry can be seen in a number of British Fashion Council (BFC) initiatives. Following the death of Princess Diana in 1997, the

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Mandy Merck

– action adventure, costume drama, the ‘biopic’ and melodrama – with which it is portrayed in fiction film? How do these understandings shift with the international production and consumption of such fictions? What connections are drawn between royal celebrity and movie stardom? How is the deference with which the British royal family has historically been portrayed in its national media affected by the greater informality of

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

establishment of what has long been termed in Australia, a ‘bunyip aristocracy’. 2 It also revealed the complexity of an entirely independent Australia’s relationship to the British monarchy. This return to royal honours comes in the wake of a series of mediated public relations ‘successes’ for the British royal family in the twenty-first century. In Britain the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, the

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Mike Huggins

British society. The general acquiescence by followers of racing in its inequality and snobbery may have helped them acquiesce in society’s wider inequalities, ensuring that gentlemanliness remained embedded in normative models of Britishness. The popular and racing press, as we have seen, only rarely attacked racing’s ruling bodies. Crowds at race-meetings were shown as having a sense of 207 208 Horseracing and the British, 1919–39 tradition and history and as sharing in the delight of the Aga Khan, Lord Derby or the royal family at their successes. The doings of

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
Charles V. Reed

the twentieth century. This chapter aims to understand how Victorian royals thought and talked about the empire through the lens of the royal tour. As a whole, the Victorian royal family was deeply and profoundly ambivalent about the British Empire. Victoria’s consort Prince Albert and her grandson George, the future George V, were the most important exception to this observation. After Albert’s demise

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

instances of cruelty reinforce the Prince’s own belief that the Windsors are not a family but a ‘firm’ – a reference to the beginning of the royal family circulating as a brand in the global marketplace. The pressures of the nuclear family and the impossibility of reconciling private desires with patriarchal power and duty – that is, the stuff of family melodramas – are rendered more acute for royals since

in The British monarchy on screen
Raymond Hinnebusch

traditional sectarian, tribal and family assabiya to create cores of trusted followers around the leader similar to royal families in the monarchies. (3) In their search for legitimisation, state elites made use of sub- and supra-state identities to make up for thin popular identifications with the state itself. In the monarchies patriarchal loyalties and Islam were the favoured formula; in the republics Pan-Arabism, the official ideology, was buttressed by the exploitation of sub-state loyalties, whether it was Tikriti solidarity in Iraq or that of

in The international politics of the Middle East
Open Access (free)
The racecourse and racecourse life
Mike Huggins

other prestigious meetings. In the Enclosure one could see and be seen, and for favoured individuals the queen might sometimes send an equerry with a specially-worded invitation to join her. The Private Stand at Newmarket, where members of the Jockey Club had to sign and countersign guests, was also highly select. The royal family stood at the apex of the upper class, sharing much of the landed aristocracy’s tastes and lifestyle. King George V had a good knowledge of thoroughbred breeding and racing.15 He enjoyed going to the races, especially at Newmarket, where he

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

, but in that time and place – hierarchical, absolute, authoritarian, and paternalist. So while the royal presence of Henry VIII had been composed of kingship as a unique identity sustained by no characteristic other than royal grandeur and divine sanction, with purple and cloth of gold denied to all but the royal family and with a richness of dress which set him apart, 12 that of Charles II after the English Civil War and the execution of his father had a religious dimension which engaged, or attempted to engage, with the demanding religious aspirations of at least

in Cultivating political and public identity