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From the Global to the Local

through the reconfiguration of health-care provision (including changes in maternity care) and educational systems (resulting in significantly larger classes). In turn, the reduction of employment and pension rights is resulting in an unsustainable strain on service providers and the potential ‘migration’ of employees, current and future, away from UNRWA. Nonetheless, while justified through reference to the ‘severity of the funding shortfall’, the reduction of services must be viewed as part of a broader historical trend in defunding and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

), ‘ Data Hubris? Humanitarian Information Systems and the Mirage of Technology’ , Third World Quarterly , doi: 10.1080/01436597.2015.1136208 . Sandvik , K. B. ( 2014 ), ‘ Humanitarian Innovation, Humanitarian Renewal?’ , Forced Migration Review Supplement: Innovation and Refugees . Sandvik , K. B. ( 2017 ), ‘ Now is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

masse, might be able to bring pressure to bear to relieve suffering (mobilised citizens in the West) to think that something is being done so they need not act nor feel guilty. Donations are given instrumentally, to prevent migration, and as the wages of sin, a palliative for guilt and shame. Humanitarian actions might help prevent armies of the dispossessed from flooding the shores of the wealthy by keeping those who suffer ‘over there’. Whatever the reasons, the fact that international and local NGOs are heroically working to deal with the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)

Rohinton Mistry is the only author whose every novel has been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Such a Long Journey (1991), A Fine Balance (1995) and Family Matters (2002) are all set in India's Parsee community. Recognised as one of the most important contemporary writers of postcolonial literature, Mistry's subtle yet powerful narratives engross general readers, excite critical acclaim and form staple elements of literature courses across the world. This study provides an insight into the key features of Mistry's work. It suggests how the author's writing can be read in terms of recent Indian political history, his native Zoroastrian culture and ethos, and the experience of migration, which now sees him living in Canada. The texts are viewed through the lens of diaspora and minority discourse theories to show how Mistry's writing is illustrative of marginal positions in relation to sanctioned national identities. In addition, Mistry utilises and blends the conventions of oral storytelling common to the Persian and South Asian traditions, with nods in the direction of the canonical figures of modern European literature, sometimes reworking and reinflecting their registers and preoccupations to create a distinctive voice redolent of the hybrid inheritance of Parsee culture and of the postcolonial predicament more generally.

Postsocialist, post-conflict, postcolonial?

This book explains theoretical work in postcolonial and postsocialist studies to offer a novel and distinctive insight into how Yugoslavia is configured by, and through, race. It presents the history of how ideas of racialised difference have been translated globally in Yugoslavia. The book provides a discussion on the critical race scholarship, global historical sociologies of 'race in translation' and south-east European cultural critique to show that the Yugoslav region is deeply embedded in global formations of race. It considers the geopolitical imagination of popular culture; the history of ethnicity; and transnational formations of race before and during state socialism, including the Non-Aligned Movement. The book also considers the post-Yugoslav discourses of security, migration, terrorism and international intervention, including the War on Terror and the refugee crisis. It elaborates how often-neglected aspects of the history of nationhood and migration reveal connections that tie the region into the global history of race. The book also explains the linkage between ethnic exclusivism and territory in the ethnopolitical logic of the Bosnian conflict and in the internationally mediated peace agreements that enshrined it: 'apartheid cartography'. Race and whiteness remained perceptible in post-war Bosnian identity discourses as new, open-ended forms of post-conflict international intervention developed.

Editor: Bill Schwarz

Caribbean migration to Britain brought many new things—new music, new foods, new styles. It brought new ways of thinking too. This book explores the intellectual ideas that the West Indians brought with them to Britain. It shows that, for more than a century, West Indians living in Britain developed a dazzling intellectual critique of the codes of Imperial Britain. Chapters discuss the influence of, amongst others, C. L. R. James, Una Marson, George Lamming, Jean Rhys, Claude McKay and V. S. Naipaul. The contributors draw from many different disciplines to bring alive the thought and personalities of the figures they discuss, providing a picture of intellectual developments in Britain from which we can still learn much. The introduction argues that the recovery of this Caribbean past, on the home territory of Britain itself, reveals much about the prospects of multiracial Britain.

Open Access (free)
Migration research and the media

Living Research Three: Migration research and the media One of the motivations for our project was to use research to intervene in public debates on immigration by providing alternative perspectives on what is often a polarised and entrenched debate where the perspectives of migrants and racially minoritised communities barely feature (Conlan, 2014 ; Migrant Voice, 2014 ) and where, as we found

in Go home?
Imaginaries, power, connected worlds

dimensions of inter-​civilisational engagement:  migration, deep engagement in economic relations, cultural exchange and creation, and political reconstruction of civilisational models. The four dimensions are not exhaustively treated and are analytics for further substantive research, starting with the exploration in chapters in the subsequent part. This chapter features several examples that illustrate aspects of the argument. Most of them are remote from the twenty-​first century and are chosen to illuminate what has generally been neglected:  the very early development

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Borders, ticking clocks and timelessness among temporary labour migrants in Israel

minds would be impossible, and with that, all life together.’ Cross-border migration offers an interesting challenge to these naturalised views of shared time structures. Due to transnationalism, nostalgia and cultural difference, migrants exist both according to local temporal norms and home-country timescapes. In this simultaneity, time is not linear but layered, with competing, sometimes contradictory strains, imaging home while living in the new rhythms of the receiving state. This is a normal result of transnationalism and common to all immigrants (Cwerner 2001

in Migrating borders and moving times

: Netherland Geographical Studies. Hartman, B., 2011. ‘Yishai: Every African ‘Infiltrator’ will Return Home’. Jerusalem Post . Available at www.jpost.com/National-News/Yishai-Every-African-infiltrator-will-return-home (accessed 5 September 2015). Huysmans, J., 2000. ‘The European Union and the Securitization of Migration’, Journal of Common Market Studies 38(5): 751

in Security/ Mobility