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ourselves’, and yet also insist that ‘reading Beowulf , even after all these years is not like talking to an old friend’. 16 And yet, even though the poem offers itself up to questions of old friends very naturally, intimacy is rarely articulated openly as a guiding critical framework. Many times when intimacy is invoked in places where we would expect to see it – in queer theory, affect studies, and theories of sensation or phenomenology – it functions metaphorically as a descriptor of a certain kind

in Dating Beowulf
Foregrounding the body and performance in plays by Gina Moxley, Emma Donoghue and Marina Carr

Spaces: Phenomenology and Performance in Contemporary Drama (Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press), 1994, pp. 186–7. Elaine Aston, An Introduction to Feminism and Theatre (London and New York: Routledge, 1995), pp. 51–2. Lib Taylor, ‘Shape-shifting and Role-splitting: Theatre, Body and Identity’, in Naomi Segal, Lib Taylor and Roger Cook (eds), Indeterminate Bodies (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003), pp. 164–5. Judith Butler, ‘Performative Acts and Gender Constitution’ in Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan (eds), Literary Theory: An Anthology, second edition

in Irish literature since 1990

is claimed to either be the only real source and substance of all drama or fundamental to none of it. 21 Thinking very particularly about the bread and wine of the Mass, Sofer considers differing theological positions on the phenomenology of the Mass that can offer ‘distinct models for understanding how objects become signs on stage without effacing their material being’: the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation; the Lutheran doctrine of consubstantiation in which the host is both bread and flesh; and the

in Enacting the Bible in medieval and early modern drama

Ingold, Being Alive, pp. 15–​32. 44 Ingold, Being Alive, pp.  30–​1. In this section, Ingold is critiquing Christopher Tilley’s The Materiality of Stone:  Explorations in Landscape Phenomenology (Oxford: Berghahn, 2004). 45 Orton and Wood with Lees, Fragments of History, p. 142. 46 ‘Swan’: Ferdinand Holthausen, ‘Anglosaxonica Minora’, Beiblatt zur Anglia, 36 (1925), 219–​20; ‘quill pen’:  F.  H. Whitman, Old English Riddles (Ottawa:  Canadian Federation for the Humanities, 1982), pp.  144–​8; ‘figurehead’:  see Williamson, Old English Riddles of the Exeter Book, pp

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture

cooperation at various levels of film culture. REFERENCES Adetiba, E. and T. Burke (2017). ‘Tarana Burke says #MeToo should center marginalized communities’, The Nation (17 November), www.thenation.com/​article/​tarana-​ burke-​says-​metoo-​isnt-​just-​for-​white-​people (accessed 18 February 2017). Ahmed, S. (2004). The Cultural Politics of Emotion. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Ahmed, S. (2006). Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Ahmed, S. (2010). The Promise of Happiness. Durham, NC: Duke University

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids

Spenser, Knapp explains that the ‘central paradox of Christian epistemology’ is ‘that the only path to the invisible truth leads through the visible world’. 50 Knapp discusses Spenser’s Protestant-minded negotiation of this paradox with reference to Marion’s Catholic phenomenology, which claims that invisible truth can be reached through ‘phenomenal lived experience’. 51 Spenser, in Knapp

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
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Ecopoetics, enjoyment and ecstatic hospitality

pays tribute, albeit more obliquely. In its interweaving of Heideggerian phenomenology, Adorno and Horkheimer’s Marxist critique of the domination of nature within capitalist modernity, and Michel Serres’s notion of a ‘natural contract’, Bate’s take on Clare in The Song of the Earth was important in foregrounding the relationship between human psychophysical wellbeing and socio-ecological conditions. As I have argued elsewhere (Rigby 2004), however, I think that in his reception of Heidegger, Bate is lured into an anthropocentric over-valuation of the poetic word

in Literature and sustainability
Sustaining literature

its Joycean mode aims for maximal inclusion of all the forces of the material word, inscribing all the potentialities of the sign in a single book, while phenomenology would aim to intuit a sense beyond all the singular incarnations that would be present for any subject whatever. Since equivocity always evidences a certain depth of development and concealment of a past, and when one wishes to assume and interiorize The twilight of the Anthropocene 125 the memory of a culture in a kind of recollection (Erinnerung) in the Hegelian sense, one has, facing this

in Literature and sustainability