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Considerations and consequences

the ideological precepts by which they are informed and conditioned. Especially in an age of geographic information systems – wherein lies an increasingly stark disparity between the visual appearance of the map itself on one hand, and the numerical data that it claims to represent on the other – the parameters within which such representations are given, and the socio-political consequences of such ‘givenness’ must be analysed with intense scrutiny. Digital mapping gives us a world through the binding of quantitative information to a set of representational

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
The restructuring of work and production in the international political economy

5 The ‘contested’ firm: the restructuring of work and production in the international political economy no involuntary changes have ever spontaneously restructured or reorganised a mode of production; … changes in productive relationships are experienced in social and cultural life, refracted in men’s ideas and their values, and argued through in their actions, their choices and their beliefs. (Thompson, 1976/1994: 222) T he desire to comprehend, order and manage the dual dynamics of globalisation and restructuring has led to much attention being paid to the

in Globalisation contested
Art and the temporalities of geomedia

”’ rather than its wholeness as a ‘natural’ image’ of an object (Dorrian, 2013: 299). Unlike Wood, Dorrian sees 146 Stitching memories a significant ­difference between the cloud-swirled blue marbles of the Apollo photographs and the cloudless, eternal day of mosaicked satellite imagery; he argues that these patchwork worlds are a new kind of political map where differing resolutions and image upload frequencies speak more of Western political, security and economic interests, wherever they may lie, than they do of the bounded territories of nation-states. Regardless

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Back to the future

places as against spaces. Places, in these stitchings, become holders for memory, moments or rhythms, that might be recombined in a reflective story of mapping with particular and unique resonances. To look at these kinds of practices through a temporal lens does not so much obliterate spatiality, but instead alters the analysis beyond modern conceptions, shifting to a more hybrid understanding of tempo-spatial translations. There is nothing inevitable about flow, and rich place-based analyses are needed to explore how the politics of placeholding emerges in a

in Time for mapping
The restructuring of work in Germany

state-societies (Giddens, 1998). Gerhard Schröder’s apparent embracing of the individualism and ‘workfare’ (Jessop, 1994) strategy of Blair’s ‘Third Way’ in his ‘Neue Mitte’ concept may be read as indicative of an acceptance of the necessary restructuring imperatives of a global economy. Yet, when we explore the debate taking place within and outside German state-society it becomes clear that the representation of Germany as a rigid and inflexible political economy in need of radical restructuring is by no means uncontested. An effective counter to neo-liberal claims

in Globalisation contested

2 Nodes, ways and relations Joe Gerlach Here, now Maps, mappings, cartographies; (dis)orientations for the everyday, obdurate disciplinary motifs of and for geography, maligned and admired in variable measure. Cartography; a science and set of practices once pertaining to sovereign power alone, yet now increasingly diffuse in its geographic reach and performance. Nonetheless, whether rendered through hegemonic, quotidian or hybrid assemblages, mapping remains resolutely (geo)political at a range of disparate registers; statist to somatic. Elsewhere, I have used

in Time for mapping
The case for practice theory

Situationist 156 Stitching memories movements (Rasmussen, 2004); and second, through theoretical critique of the power relations between map content and spatial knowledge(s). On the latter, key moments include Harley and Woodward’s History of Cartography (Andrews, 2001) – a massively ambitious (and on-going) project, intended to redress subaltern dynamics within map representation (Harley, 1987). In drawing on Harley’s combination of post-structuralism, semiotics and social constructionism, the project sought to critique knowledge-politics in map representation (1988a

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Mapping times

political and social positions, but interestingly temporality was only rarely explored by critical thinkers focusing on mapping. Further, radical rethinking of space-time and time-space from the position of animating the construct (see Merriman, 2011) underplays the implications of digital mapping for temporality: a point we return to in the conclusion to this chapter. For the moment though, it is safe to argue that few attempts have been made to resolve the paradoxes of this spatio-temporal dualism from the perspective of the digital aspect of digital maps. As previously

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas

a conception of experience across a space of time’ that was a reaction to the contemporary destruction of space at the hands of increased speed (Harvey, 1989: 267). Harvey diagnoses this capitalist-fuelled modernist transformation in the relationship between time and space as ‘time-space compression’, and notes that the second, intensive round of it emerged with postmodernism (Harvey, 1989: 283). This latest period of the ‘time-space compression’ is identified by Harvey as ‘an intense phase’ that has had a ‘disorienting and disruptive impact upon political

in Time for mapping
A trialogue

smellsYes. And there’s some cape flow almost from the work by Alex Rhys-Taylor mode of production? As of Goldsmiths College, capital alters the world, London, about this … he does that in turn alter the walks from Shoreditch into smellscape? central London and locates political change through altered smellscapes (see Rhys-Taylor, 2015). In that walk he says you can smell gentrification. Street food has become a large 78 Ephemerality/mobility part of the urban smellscape in the UK as the evenings witness outdoor bars sharing their clientele with gourmet food shacks. And

in Time for mapping