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The revolt of democratic Christianity and the rise of public opinion

Jansénisme à la laïcité et les origines de la déchristianisation (Paris: Editions de la Maison des Sciences de L’Homme, 1987). Conventicles: independent Huguenot congregations. Doyle, Jansenism, pp. 30, 39. Van Kley, The Religious Origins of the French Revolution, p. 248. McManners, Church and Society in Eighteenth-Century France, vol. 2, pp. 364, 377. Doyle, Jansenism, pp. 50–1. McManners, Church and Society in Eighteenth-Century France, vol. 2, p. 428. On the Parlement of Paris and Jansenism see also J. Swann, Politics and the Parlement of Paris under Louis XV, 1754

in The Enlightenment and religion
A case study in the construction of a myth

The English deist movement 3 The English deist movement: a case study in the construction of a myth The essence of this chapter is that it is not possible to understand the development of the myth of the English deist movement without grasping the politico-religious context of late-seventeenth- and early-eighteenth-century England and the growing role of public opinion and opinion-makers within it. Some preliminary remarks on the major elements of the politico-religious configuration of late Tudor and Stuart England are therefore necessary. Post

in The Enlightenment and religion
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currently, though undeservedly, remain unfashionable in the historiography of early modern catholicism. Since the 1950s, the customary concentration on the institutional aspects of Catholic reform has been counterbalanced by a new emphasis on the ‘religion of the people’. With the welcome broadening of horizons brought by the histoire des mentalités and socio-historical methods of research, increasing attention has been paid to the religious culture of the ‘ordinary’ Christians whose lives were affected, to a greater or lesser extent, by the profound shifts in belief and

in Fathers, pastors and kings

the archbishop of Rouen, François de Harlay de Champvallon, revoked the regulars’ sacramental and preaching privileges in his diocese. Archbishop Harlay chap 3 22/3/04 86 12:52 pm Page 86 FATHERS, PASTORS AND KINGS demanded attendance at parish mass on Sundays and feast days, and forbade religious to preach or to hold congregations and processions at this time. Regular superiors, moreover, were ordered to present their confessors to curés for their authorisation. Religious not approved in this manner would not be permitted either to confess or to communicate

in Fathers, pastors and kings

is the increasing acceptability of the ‘Wilderness People’, as they were known in the nineteenth century, as an urban presence. The Spiritual or Shaker Baptists, as they became known, were officially banned altogether for some sixty years for religious practices that alarmed mainstream colonial society (though the ban was enforced for less than half of that time). My second example is the changing

in Frontiers of the Caribbean

sermons it observed in Bolton.58 This may well have been effective in shaping the attitudes of at least some church congregations, but as Rev. Gillie admitted in evidence to the 1923 Select Committee, there was no attempt to go outside the Church to persuade.59 Effort was probably wasted in constant preaching to the possibly already converted. As another anti-gambler pointed out, ‘you may preach all the sermons you like, the bookmakers are not there to hear them’.60 Yet few noted that many Christians and other religious believers were involved in racing and betting. In

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
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The clergy and emigration in principle

height of prosperity unprecedented in all its former history’, and William Hancock alluded to ‘the favour with which emigration is still viewed amongst Presbyterians’ when he drew attention to a plan for Presbyterian settlement in New Zealand being promoted by clergy in several congregations in 1863.142 However, it is likely that Hancock was reading too much into what may well have been a one-off initiative to safeguard the religious and moral welfare of those for whom emigration was the only alternative to the workhouse, and in that sense, like similar

in Population, providence and empire
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Nuns’ narratives in early modern Venice

cuckolding God himself.28 But if this dimension to the crime was understood, it was not prominent in the rhetoric of either the secular or religious authorities. In the preamble to the trial, the patriarch held forth at some length about the damage wrought by the nuns upon a wall which was six stones deep, before finally revealing that one of the men (Foscarini) had stayed within the convent ‘for ten to twelve days eating and drinking wine, and [that] he had carnal commerce with Suor Laura’.29 The patriarch’s central concern was with the breach of conventual enclosure

in Judicial tribunals in England and Europe, 1200–1700

language in its spoken and written forms new status in the religious domain. Lastly, the period from the Restoration to about 1830 is considered. At the beginning of the period traditionalist (mainly clerical) intellectuals ‘felt that the life blood was ebbing away from Wales, Welsh history was regarded as an irrelevance, the language was becoming a mere patois, and traditional culture . . . was waning even among the more isolated common folk’.2 The religious imperative, however, promoted schemes for literacy in Welsh. Although a relatively low rate of literacy existed

in The spoken word
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Frontier patterns old and new

consumption. Smoking marijuana, for example, has been recognised to be ‘widely prevalent in the lower socio-economic groups in Jamaica for more than one hundred years’ (Thorburn, 1974 : 19). During this time the drug has acquired a long history of use as a spiritual herb among the Rastafarian religious sect and in more recent years its use has spread across the range of social classes. Possession of 2 oz or

in Frontiers of the Caribbean