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Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

categories of staff or of other civilians, but stopping short of comparing staff and other civilians. Larissa Fast, for example, laments the differential treatment accorded to refugees compared with the internally displaced, and to international staff compared with national staff, but says nothing of the differential treatment accorded to displaced persons on the one hand and staff on the other ( Fast, 2015 : 119, 127). The comparison in this article

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lessons Learned for Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States
Logan Cochrane

Introduction After decades of conflict, an agreement in 2005 set in motion the processes that would lead South Sudan to become an independent nation-state in 2011. After an initial period of optimism, conflict re-emerged; first over control of oil resources in 2012, and then in the form of a civil war, starting in 2013. The conflict has caused the displacement of millions of people internally and internationally as refugees. Compounded by the lack of basic infrastructure and services, limited capacity, and minimal governmental presence outside of Juba

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller and Róisín Read

working-class women adopt in exile in Jordan, the article carefully interrogates shifting gender and power dynamics. In doing so it questions the fashionable humanitarian focus on self-reliance and entrepreneurship, as well as youth, but demonstrates how individual and family well-being often relies on rather different parameters. A better understanding among humanitarian actors of what refugee women themselves perceive as valuable lives would be a welcome step in advancing gendered aspirations

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell, and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

in humanitarian response is the Rohingya refugee crisis. In August 2018, Translators without Borders (TWB) surveyed a sample of refugees in the Kutupalong–Balukhali camp (407 respondents) to better understand their language and information needs ( Hasan, 2018 ). TWB found that language barriers and low access to media left many Rohingya refugees without the crucial information they needed to get support and make informed choices. Communication was made even more

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

’, Gender & Development , 27 : 2 , 337 – 53 , doi: 10.1080/13552074.2019.1615281 . Lokot , M. ( 2019 ), ‘ The Space between Us: Feminist Values and Humanitarian Power Dynamics in Research with Refugees ’, Gender & Development , 27 : 3 , 467 – 84 , doi: 10

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Paul Currion

-113340 . Bloom , L. and Betts , A. ( 2013 ), ‘ The Two Worlds of Humanitarian Innovation’ , Working Paper Series No. 94 ( Oxford : Refugee Studies Centre ). Carbonnier , G. ( 2015 ), Humanitarian Economics: War, Disaster and the Global Aid Market ( London : C. Hurst

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

declined ( Mair, 2013 ). While NGOs lay claim to a ‘non-governmental’ status, direct action thrived when donor sovereignty was, paradoxically, still able to cast a shadow. Given the refugee crisis, few can today contemplate the wretched state of ‘official’ humanitarianism without some disquiet. Despite what we may wish or demand, however, it is unlikely that significant improvement will occur any time soon. But to then conclude that humanitarianism is dead would be a mistake. While autonomous international direct action lies buried in the rubble of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

followed relief operations for starving populations, refugees and genocide survivors in Central and Eastern European countries. The defeat of Germany and the partitioning of multinational empires led to the creation of new states, thus sending millions of displaced persons on the road, which – together with the war – provoked unprecedented deprivations throughout Europe. The 1917 Bolshevik Revolution and the civil war in Russia also threatened Central Europe to fall under Soviet influence. The 1921–22 Russian famine thus triggered a large-scale international response

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

Introduction All over the globe, fascism, racism and xenophobic nationalism are resurfacing in what we once thought of as ‘respectable’ democracies. Following a particularly bleak weekend at the end of October 2018 (the election of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, reports of worsening famine in Yemen, Israeli bombardment of Gaza and the murder of eleven worshippers at a refugee-harbouring synagogue in Pittsburgh), my colleague Dr Sara Salem of the London School of Economics tweeted: ‘It’s difficult watching political scientists scrambling to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

‘liberal space’ and its likely consequences for humanitarian action; Mark Duffield, on ‘post-humanitarianism’ and the government of precarity; Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, on the impact on Palestinian refugees of US budget cuts under Donald Trump; José Luis Fiori, on the new security strategy of the US and the disavowal of liberal internationalism; David Rieff, on the legitimacy of humanitarian agencies in a changing political landscape; Mel Bunce, on

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs