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Between humanitarianism and pragmatism
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

for the Russian Empire. Most Russian diplomats and other high-ranking officials, most of them aristocrats, though not immune to the ideological, political and cultural differences within Russian society, were attuned to the reigning spirit and culture of Europe. Thus they upheld the concept of legitimacy, diplomatic dialogue and limited war as a last resort in order to resolve outstanding conflicts that could not be settled by concord. 2 Despite the overall Russian

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
Security, mobility, liberals, and Christians
Luis Lobo-Guerrero

and Vaughan-Williams 2008 ). By the time he began to think about the mobility elements that had made his journey so easy, he was already falling asleep. If he had kept awake, he would have had to think about the politics, logistics, and economics involved in international air travel (cf. Salter 2008 ), in planning cities, in designing, upgrading, and operating the urban transport systems so that

in Security/ Mobility
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

The philhellenes Contrary to the aloofness of the powers, bar Russia, European and American public opinion had been on the Greek side almost from the beginning. What made the difference with the uprising of the Serbs in previous decades and the more recent rebellions for political rights in Spain, Portugal, Naples, Sicily, Piedmont and Sardinia (1820–21) was that the Greek uprising had become a cause célèbre , giving rise to an impressive wave of what

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Israeli security experience as an international brand
Erella Grassiani

, and A. Thumala, 2010. ‘Consuming Security? Tools for a Sociology of Security Consumption’, Theoretical Criminology 14(1): 3–30. Gordon, N., 2008. ‘From Colonization to Separation: Exploring the Structure of Israel’s Occupation’, Third World Quarterly 29(1): 25–44. Gordon, N., 2009. The Political Economy of Israel’s Homeland Security

in Security/ Mobility
Data becoming risk information
Nathaniel O’Grady

reasons. Firstly, it furthers our understanding of the mobilisation of data because it informs us as to who and what intervenes to make data move and become operable in the FRS. And secondly, I show how decisions around what data is mobilised actually affects how risk appears. The politics of transmission, mobility, and circulation, in other words, affects what will come to appear as fire risk on those posters affixed

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
A bird’s eye view of intervention with emphasis on Britain, 1875–78
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

‘Bulgarian Revival’ ( vŭzrazhdane ) 14 had taken place. The first major Bulgarian political revolutionary was Georgi Rakowski, who died of tuberculosis in 1867, but not before he put on course the idea of overthrowing Ottoman rule. He was followed by journalist Lyuben Karavelov, poet Christo Botev and the main organizer, Vasil Levski (the ‘Apostle of Freedom’). 15 Karavelov, Botev and Levski, as expatriates in Bucharest, formed the Bulgarian Revolutionary Central Committee

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Setting the precedent

This book is an attempt at a comprehensive presentation of the history of humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century, the heyday of this controversial doctrine. It starts with a brief presentation of the present situation and debate. The theoretical first part of the book starts with the genealogy of the idea, namely the quest for the progenitors of the idea in the sixteenth and seventeenth century which is a matter of controversy. Next the nineteenth century ‘civilization-barbarity’ dichotomy is covered and its bearing on humanitarian intervention, with its concomitant Eurocentric/Orientalist gaze towards the Ottomans and other states, concluding with the reaction of the Ottomans (as well as the Chinese and Japanese). Then the pivotal international law dimension is scrutinized, with the arguments of advocates and opponents of humanitarian intervention from the 1830s until the 1930s. The theoretical part of the book concludes with nineteenth century international political theory and intervention (Kant, Hegel, Cobden, Mazzini and especially J.S. Mill). In the practical second part of the book four cases studies of humanitarian intervention are examined in considerable detail: the Greek case (1821-1831), the Lebanon/Syria case (1860-61), the Balkan crisis and Bulgarian case (1875-78) in two chapters, and the U.S. intervention in Cuba (1895-98). Each cases study concludes with its bearing on the evolution of international norms and rules of conduct in instances of humanitarian plights. The concluding chapter identifies the main characteristics of intervention on humanitarian grounds during this period and today’s criticism and counter-criticism.