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Emigration and sectarian rivalry

and against it during its lifetime. In a sense, therefore, the controversy can be seen as a distillation of wider clerical attitudes: many Protestant and Catholic conceptions of migration and how it might affect their churches are present here, albeit often in their most extreme form. This section will explore them. The new religious movement had its immediate roots in the rise of Irish evangelicalism in the late eighteenth century, and began in earnest in the 1820s when a section of Church of Ireland clergy, encouraged by the spectre of Catholic Emancipation

in Population, providence and empire
Handling urban overflows

flowing liquidity led to talk about ‘stemming the tide’ of the flood, which as soon as new obstacles, Moving in a sea of strangers 61 barbed wire, or identity checks were installed, found new ways of trickling north. British Prime Minister David Cameron talked about the migration as a ‘swarm’ (Kingsley, 2016: 42). The metaphor of overflow was also used to describe the situation in the host countries. How many refugees can we absorb? When does the breaking-point occur? The question of too many could take many forms: too many unidentified persons, too great a burden on

in Overwhelmed by overflows?

discuss government migration campaigns in terms of the policy logic that shapes them. Specifically, we argue: Liberal government treats issues like migration in the aggregate, meaning that statistics and macroeconomics tend to be the ultimate arbiters of ‘good’ policy. This emphasis on aggregates has lost legitimacy where migration is concerned, meaning that the politics and policy of migration is increasingly

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
The management of migration between care and control

ongoing ‘war on migrants’ is too often framed as a humanitarian emergency: these are some of the images we usually associate with the so-called ‘migration crisis’. 1 Nevertheless, this ‘crisis’ is neither new nor exceptional, especially when viewed through a historical lens. This discourse of an allegedly uncontrolled ‘invasion’ of Europe dates back to the 1990s when the alarming image was first used particularly in the

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)

succeeded in breaking down that intimidating number by establishing broad patterns of who departed and when, where from and where to, and the gender and class balances amongst them. They have documented and contextualised the experiences of individual migrants as gleaned from thousands of surviving letters and memoirs.2 Consequently we know a great deal about ‘the Irish diaspora’ and its often profound impact on the countries to which it spread. Yet the great blind spot of migration history is the effect a significant national diaspora has on the sending society.3 After

in Population, providence and empire
Open Access (free)
‘Ordinary’ people and immigration politics

. (Frances Stonor Saunders, 2016 : 8) In January 2001, with the Twin Towers still standing, Lehman Brothers still trading and Blairism at its most popular, the UK government's Cabinet Office published a paper, ‘Migration: An Economic and Social Analysis’ (Cabinet Office, 2001 ). Reviewing various sources of economic evidence on migration, the general thrust of the analysis was unambiguous: immigration is economically beneficial

in Go home?
Open Access (free)

This chapter concludes this book, which concerns the Black Atlantic, a geographic region and a theoretical framework that helps to understand the experiences of a transnational racialized community, and the importance of Black people’s travel. This chapter specifies the cultural and migration flows within Canada, England, the United States, and the Caribbean, and the ways the boundaries around an Afro-Caribbean-Canadian community are made and crossed with special attention paid to race, ethnicity, and gender. In conversations about the Black Atlantic and the Caribbean diaspora, the use of recreational sport to connect migrants to the homeland and each other has been virtually ignored. This chapter shows how the entire text moves beyond the runs, wickets, bowling, and batting of cricket to draw attention to local and deterritorialized community building, transnational travel and social networks, hetero-masculinities and femininities, nostalgia of older adults, historical and contemporary Indo-Afro ethnic antagonism, and persistent national identities that constitute the Afro-Caribbean diaspora and Black identity in Canada. These complexities help us to understand how the Black Atlantic is defined both through its décalages or disjunctures – that is, who is missing or unwelcomed – and also through its unified, shared experiences and cultures.

in Sport in the Black Atlantic

, materialise interactions between migrants and those who stay behind, and provide a window onto the social, cultural and economic characteristics of the destination countries. I am interested here in the role and meaning of these flows in migration processes and border crossings. The material flows transgress polity borders and social boundaries, reconstruct existing relationships, reaffirm marriage and create material wealth. They stand in as a material presence for absent female migrants, since they materialise the relationships between female migrants and their stay

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)

communities, for migrants and British citizens alike. This body of research is a timely and vital exploration of the changing face of immigration control, government communication campaigns and their effects. Migration is not just about a journey; it is also the story of settlement – be it for a little while or a lifetime. Infrequent tabloid stories about the children of foreign-born parents sometimes label them as migrants despite the fact that most

in Go home?
Public presence, discourse, and migrants as threat

Greece as a major problem for the nation. The material I examine in this chapter focuses mostly on the conservative and centre-left newspapers that represent the core of the mainstream press in Greece. The Law School crisis resonated with the general problem of illegal migration in Greece. By representing the public presence of migrants in the Law School of Athens as a serious problem, the press

in Security/ Mobility