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communities, for migrants and British citizens alike. This body of research is a timely and vital exploration of the changing face of immigration control, government communication campaigns and their effects. Migration is not just about a journey; it is also the story of settlement – be it for a little while or a lifetime. Infrequent tabloid stories about the children of foreign-born parents sometimes label them as migrants despite the fact that most

in Go home?
Public presence, discourse, and migrants as threat

Greece as a major problem for the nation. The material I examine in this chapter focuses mostly on the conservative and centre-left newspapers that represent the core of the mainstream press in Greece. The Law School crisis resonated with the general problem of illegal migration in Greece. By representing the public presence of migrants in the Law School of Athens as a serious problem, the press

in Security/ Mobility
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future agenda. Demographic strategies We might start with one of the coping strategies that informed the original economy of makeshifts concept – migration and demographic realignment. Historical demographers have in the last two decades been busy exploding key myths about the propensity of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century people to move and their reasons for doing so. While early commentators such as Arthur Redford lumped most poor migrants together as ‘subsistence migrants’ caught in an inexorable drift towards towns, the work of Pooley and Turnbull in particular

in The poor in England 1700–1850
Lessons for critical security studies?

of this, I take a step back and reflect more broadly on the intersections, actual and potential, between the literatures on mobilities and critical security studies. The ‘new mobilities paradigm’ emerged across different disciplines from sociology to geography, anthropology to business studies, migration and tourism to urban studies. 1 Mobility may be undoubtedly fashionable but evaluating its

in Security/ Mobility

might otherwise be blurry. Citizenship helped maintain good fences. But it could do that kind of work only on the margins – in border zones and in the context of limited migration. For the most part, nationality wasn't arbitrary. It reflected social attachment. Today, citizenship no longer serves a border-policing function. Nor could it. The lines have gotten too blurry on the ground. It is no longer clear where one citizenry leaves off and the

in Democratic inclusion
The canadianizing 1920s

opportunity for economic development and a means of renewal for a British race polluted by industrial urbanization, all of which would serve to strengthen the Empire. 9 As Stephen Constantine so neatly sums it up: The claimed benefits of female migration were therefore essentially conservative: the confirmation of women’s traditional roles and the

in Female imperialism and national identity

politically ambivalent ways discussing how these perspectives have been used to develop forms of resistance to government anti-immigrant policies and rhetoric. Devaluing migration There has already been a great deal of academic analysis of the vilification of certain, usually impoverished, groups of migrants in the context of the austerity agenda (Hall, 2015 ), electoral politics (Forkert, 2014 ), differentiated citizenship, nationalism and

in Go home?
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Security/ Mobility and politics of movement

about organized crime, global terrorism, undocumented migration and other dangerous mobilities’ (Walters 2006 : 199) that render movement a central political concern. While contemporary liberal politics actively encourages and enables mobility for the sake of our modern lifestyle and the economic benefits that it yields, it also seeks to render the flows of such mobility knowledgeable and controllable

in Security/ Mobility
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UN High Commissioner for Refugees, just over 50 per cent were women (UNHCR, 2016b ). This new era of migration, which includes more women and children, is characterised for the most vulnerable by ‘necropolitics’. This term was coined by the African philosopher Achille Mbembe ( 2003 ) to describe ‘death worlds’, where ‘vast populations are subjected to conditions of life conferring upon them the status of living dead’ (p. 40

in Go home?
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Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland

difference between two main migratory and hence ‘genealogical trajectories’ connecting Albania and Montenegro: one leading from Shkodra and its surroundings to Ulcinj, and the other one from Shkodra up to Tuzi and Podgorica (see Figure 4.1). While genealogies marked by migration between Ulcinj and Shkodra were clearly mono-ethnic and mono-confessional (Albanian–Muslim), the Sarapa genealogy – which included relations stretching across present-day Albania and Montenegro north of Lake Shkodra – featured an extraordinary diversity and inclusiveness that incorporated

in Migrating borders and moving times