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5: Austerity baby I seem not to have made such a good impression when I arrived, at least not on my mother. She started keeping a baby diary on 5 July 1943, just over three months after I was born. Arrived a few days after schedule at 6.10 am Thursday. Very tiny, ugly and thin – folds of skin without any fat. Weighed 6lbs. 4ozs. She improved rapidly however – or maybe I just got more used to her, but even so when we went home (5/4/43) she wasn’t very beautiful. She gained weight very quickly & was soon looking very sweet and lovely – not only my opinion

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This book can be described as an 'oblique memoir'. The central underlying and repeated themes of the book are exile and displacement; lives (and deaths) during the Third Reich; mother-daughter and sibling relationships; the generational transmission of trauma and experience; transatlantic reflections; and the struggle for creative expression. Stories mobilised, and people encountered, in the course of the narrative include: the internment of aliens in Britain during the Second World War; cultural life in Rochester, New York, in the 1920s; the social and personal meanings of colour(s). It also includes the industrialist and philanthropist, Henry Simon of Manchester, including his relationship with the Norwegian explorer, Fridtjof Nansen; the liberal British campaigner and MP of the 1940s, Eleanor Rathbone; reflections on the lives and images of spinsters. The text is supplemented and interrupted throughout by images (photographs, paintings, facsimile documents), some of which serve to illustrate the story, others engaging indirectly with the written word. The book also explains how forced exile persists through generations through a family history. It showcases the differences between English and American cultures. The book focuses on the incidence of cancers caused by exposure to radioactivity in England, and the impact it had on Anglo-American relations.

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great-uncle Julius were about to visit them in the Rivesaltes camp in September 1942, but learned that they had just been deported. I already knew that Leo and Meta were deported from Drancy camp to Auschwitz on 16 September 1942 – from the transport list available online through the Mémorial de la Shoah in Paris, and from the Stolpersteine in Busenberg. I assumed both were murdered immediately on arrival. Claude’s mother Meta Austerity baby [ 241 ] Claude Levy (film stills) Postscript [ 242 ] Memorial boards, Jewish cemetery in Busenberg, Germany Jewish

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category C ‘where there are grounds for doubting the Austerity baby [ 41 ] Notice of arrest, June 1940 Aliens [ 42 ] reliability of an individual’. When Italy entered the war on 10 June 1940 Italian enemy aliens were also rounded up for internment, together with any remaining category C German and Austrian aliens under the age of seventy, following prime minister Winston Churchill’s order. My father’s arrest document is dated the following day. My mother, born in England in 1917, lost her British citizenship on marrying my father four months before his internment

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stone – a Stolperstein – outside the shop in Leonie’s name, another for Sigmund at their later address. The Stolpersteine, or ‘stumbling stones’, designed by Gunter Demnig, are commemorative brass plaques in the pavement outside the last known address of victims of the Holocaust. They are now in over six hundred towns in Germany, Austria and six other countries. I know very little about Leonie’s life in Offenburg, or about how their lives changed after the National Socialists came to power in January 1933. Austerity baby [ 115 ] Sara Schwarz, Sigmund, Eri and

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learned from the curators of the exhibition that Eisenmayer was still alive, and that he would probably be delighted to hear from me. Through his Philately and chemistry [ 163 ] [ 164 ] Portrait of Arthur Wolff, Isle of Man internment camp, 1940 Birthday drawing for Arthur Wolff, Isle of Man internment camp, 27 November 1940 Ernst Eisenmayer violinist drawing, in Lawnhurst apartment Austerity baby daughter in London I got his email address, and we began an online correspondence. My first email from him is dated 15 April 2010. At the time, he was living in Israel

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practical-analytic? Maybe that’s it. Austerity baby Line drawing of a woman and charcoal drawing of a man from life-drawing classes [ 221 ] Letter from London School of Contemporary Dance, 3 June 1971 Annunciation [ 222 ] With writing it has been something similar. At moments alongside a university career I have considered, sometimes attempted, so-called creative writing. The first time was when I worked at the South Bank Centre in London, before moving to the United States in 1988. In our small writing group, which met once a week at lunch time, I wrote a version

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’t remember that part). The other important Austerity baby [ 195 ] Detail of family photograph Thionville, 1953 Grave of Minette Levy, Saarlouis Jewish cemetery Spinster [ 196 ] Author as bridesmaid Author as bridesmaid (standing second from left) Author as maid of honour Austerity baby [ 197 ] Noar family photograph, north Manchester, 4 March 1964 Spinster superstition, still circulating now, was ‘three times a bridesmaid, never a bride’. A mistake I did make. hH [ 198 ] This is my grandparents’ golden wedding anniversary party. Bessie is to the right of

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sometimes had to walk home from school wearing smog masks. Still, the tone seems, to me, a bit condescending. It continues: Austerity baby Page from Henry Norr’s diary Extract from Henry Norr’s diary [3] Atlantic moves August 18th This is an ideal Manchester day – that is, pouring all day. Then there are the English eating – and drinking – habits to comment on, only partly affectionately: [4] Living with folks who have become Anglicized, we can get a pretty good idea of the English workman’s home life. We were surprised to find how many times a day the people eat

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Californian Native Americans. Austerity baby Pantone 18-3943 Blue Iris And in Western Europe since the medieval period there are plenty of examples of shifting meanings of colour terms. According to John Gage, the medieval colour terms bloi and caeruleus could each refer to blue or yellow, perhaps because of the technologies that produced them, in which mid-stage colours are transformed into others. All these authors are careful to warn us that unnamed colours are not necessarily unseen; or, rather, that the distinctions our language makes may be just as visible to those

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