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THERE ARE A number of avenues through which the ‘place’ of Indigenous people in Australia can be approached. One fundamental arena of struggle has been over land rights. The approach to rights taken here, however, starts from an account of suffering and sets out to trace the political roots of that suffering. One of the clearest forms of suffering to mark Aboriginal lives in Australia is entrenched and widespread ill-health. Thus, across the Indigenous community, the story is one of premature death, often from diseases associated with

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
So what went wrong?

5 Training the ‘natives’ as nurses in Australia: so what went wrong? Odette Best Introduction The story of the Aboriginal women who participated in Australia’s nursing history remains largely untold. In the first six decades of the twentieth century, Aboriginal people were confronted with harsh exclusionary practices that forced them to live in settlements, reserves and missions.1 While many Aboriginal women worked in domestic roles (in white people’s homes and on rural properties), small numbers were trained at public hospitals and some Aboriginal women

in Colonial caring

WOMEN’S POLICY MACHINERY IN AUSTRALIA 243 12 The life and times of women’s policy machinery in Australia1 marian sawer Historically in Australia women have been policy shapers as well as policy takers and have called on the state to promote social reform and equal opportunity. This was the path that led to the appearance of ‘femocrats’ in government in the 1970s and 1980s, with a mandate to achieve more gender equality policy outcomes. Australia became well known for its femocrats, a term that Australia gave the world, and for their innovations in governance

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung

Linda Leung (2018) Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides (Lanham, MA: Lexington Books), hardcover, 141 pages; ISBN: 978-1-14985-0002-9 In her book Technologies of Refuge and Displacement: Rethinking Digital Divides , Linda Leung – a researcher at University of Technology Sydney, Australia – provides a systematic empirical analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2011, which involved more than 100 interviews with individuals from refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation

, 28 , 998 , doi: 10.1353/hrq.2006.0039 . ACFID ( 2016 ), Innovation for Impact: How Australian NGOs Nurture and Scale Up New Ideas ( Deakin : Australian Council for International Development ). Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP) ( 2018 ), Standards for Older People and People with Disabilities: Age and Disability Consortium ( London

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts

. Sandvik , K. B. ( 2018 ), ‘ Technology, Dead Male Bodies, and Feminist Recognition: Gendering ICT Harm Theory’ , Australian Feminist Law Journal , 44 : 1 , 49 – 69 . Sandvik , K. B. ( 2019 ), ‘ Technologizing the Fight against Sexual Violence: A Critical Scoping’, PRIO Paper (Oslo: PRIO) , www

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Indigenous people in British settler colonies, 1830s–1910

This book focuses on the ways in which the British settler colonies of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa treated indigenous peoples in relation to political rights, commencing with the imperial policies of the 1830s and ending with the national political settlements in place by 1910. Drawing on a wide range of sources, its comparative approach provides an insight into the historical foundations of present-day controversies in these settler societies.

Responses to crisis and modernisation

This book considers the underlying causes of the end of social democracy's golden age. It argues that the cross-national trend in social democratic parties since the 1970s has been towards an accommodation with neo-liberalism and a corresponding dilution of traditional social democratic commitments. The book looks at the impact of the change in economic conditions on social democracy in general, before examining the specific cases of Germany, Sweden and Australia. It examines the ideological crisis that engulfed social democracy. The book also looks at the post-1970 development of social policy, its fiscal implications and economic consequences in three European countries. It considers the evolution of the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) from its re-emergence as a significant political force during the 1970s until the present day under José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero. The book also examines the evolution of the Swedish model in conjunction with social democratic reformism and the party's relations to the union movement. It explores the latest debate about what the German Social Democratic Party (SPD) stands for. The SPD became the role model for programmatic modernisation for the European centre-left. The book considers how British socialist and social democratic thought from the late nineteenth century to the present has treated the objective of helping people to fulfil their potential, talents and ambitions. It aims to contribute to a broader conversation about the future of social democracy by considering ways in which the political thought of 'third way' social democracy might be radicalised for the twenty-first century.

Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia

‘The Southern Cross has vanished in the dawn. Over the city of Sydney, the brilliance of a summer’s day has broken. It is the third of February 1954. A day of high summer – and of high history for Australia.’ So opens the narration of the Australian government film The Queen in Australia (1954), describing the triumphal entrance into Sydney Harbor of the recently crowned

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
‘Australia for the White Man’

In 1908 the prominent Australian magazine Bulletin took as its masthead the phrase ‘Australia for the White Man’. It would prove a brief and pithy indication of the place that any man or woman of colour, including Aborigines, the first people of the land, would find in the newly federated Commonwealth of Australia. From the 1870s to the first decade of the twentieth

in Equal subjects, unequal rights