Search results

Open Access (free)
Mary Chamberlain

dialectical relationship emerged also in Lamming. This was so most noticeably in his insights on the language shared, and synthesised, by both Caliban and Prospero. 26 For the language which Prospero gave to Caliban created new possibilities for thought itself: Prospero has given Caliban Language; and with it an unstated history of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Crossing the seas
Bill Schwarz

-century Caribbean fiction does carry a profound consciousness of historical time. For an overview, see Nana Wilson-Tagoe, Historical Thought and Literary Representation in West Indian Literature (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1998), and more specifically, Supriya Nair, Caliban’s Curse: George Lamming and the reconfiguring of history (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain
Winston James

’, Wellesley College, April 1991. I never claimed, contrary to Paget Henry’s caricature of my argument, that James’s celebration of Western civilisation ‘has its roots in Eurocentric tendencies that James inherited from Marxism’: Paget Henry, Caliban’s Reason: introducing Afro-Caribbean philosophy (New York: Routledge, 2000), p. 48. I know better than that and made it clear in my

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Visions of history, visions of Britain
Stephen Howe

empire 1918–1964 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993). The character of James’s anti-imperialism is debated in many of the works cited in other notes here, and in Anthony Bogues, Caliban’s Freedom: the early political thought of C. L. R. James (London: Pluto, 1997) and John Gaffar La Guerre, The Social and Political Thought of the Colonial Intelligentsia

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Steven King and Alannah Tomkins

. Muldrew, ‘Credit and the courts: debt litigation in a seventeenth century urban community’, Economic History Review, 46 (1993). J. Lawson, Letters to the Young on Progress in Pudsey Over the Last Sixty Years (Chichester, Caliban, 1977). J. Burchardt, ‘Rural social relations, 1830–50: opposition to allotments for labourers’, Agricultural History Review, 45 (1997). T. Sokoll, Essex Pauper Letters, 1731–1837 (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2001).

in The poor in England 1700–1850
Antony and Cleopatra and visual musical experience
Simon Smith

– a theatrical language describing the dramatic world. This has been recognized in part by Frances Ann Shirley, who notes that ‘musical sounds […] create the illusion of marching armies off stage’ in a number of Shakespeare’s plays. She traces the particular meanings that certain musical and non-musical sounds can convey – how ‘[a] flourish, for example, adds an air of dignity and increases our excitement’, or how ‘the words of Caliban and Barnadine before they enter not only create anticipation in the audience, but also confirm the unflattering descriptions of each

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Eric Pudney

fire; Caliban – although he is not a spirit – is associated with both earth and water. However, Shakespeare’s Tempest does not really interrogate the nature of spirit: that spirits exist, and that they are airy and rapid, is merely taken for granted. The characteristics of spirits, and the nature of their operations in the material world, are dealt with much more explicitly and in much greater depth in the song above. This particular alteration to the story would not seem to be the result any particular enthusiasm for the existence of spirits on the part of the

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

-text, III.ii.58SD and n. 58SD, and Shakespeare, The Tempest , ed. Vaughan and Vaughan 1.2.303, n. 303. 21 See Michael Baird Saenger, ‘The Costumes of Caliban and Ariel qua Sea-Nymph’, Notes and Queries , 42 ( 1995 ), 334–6; Gabriel Egan expands and supports Saenger’s original suggestion that the sea

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Christopher Abram

-Saxon fenland (Oxford: Windgather, 2017). 20 Quoted by E. Mansel Sympson, Lincolnshire (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1913), p. 54; William Shakespeare, King Lear , Act II, scene iv, line 162. On Shakespeare's knowledge and deployment of the fens in his dramas, see Todd Andrew Borlik, ‘Caliban and the fen demons of Lincolnshire: the Englishness of Shakespeare's Tempest ’, Shakespeare , 9 (2013), 21

in Dating Beowulf
Eric Pudney

Kingship’, in The Damned Art: Essays in the Literature of Witchcraft, edited by Sydney Anglo (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1985), pp. 156–81 (p. 161 and note 16). 195 Parry, pp. 265–67. Witchcraft in Elizabethan drama 129 benevolent Ariel; Caliban is not characterised as a spirit, despite his association with earth and water, which neatly complements Ariel’s association with the ‘superior’ elements of air and fire. If Friar Bacon and John a Kent are the theatrical case for the defence of magic, Faustus is the prosecution, and the prosecution seems to have won out

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681