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Owen Price and Karina Lovell

researchers to change people’s behaviour and experiences. Case example A in Figure 9 provides an example of a descriptive design: Figure 9 Case example A Descriptive design Paul is interested in looking at how common clinical depression is in people living in Bristol and what factors seem to increase the likelihood of people having depression. He sends out a questionnaire to everyone in Bristol measuring their levels of depression and collecting basic demographics such as age, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, accommodation and employment status. Paul hasn’t changed

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Patrick Callaghan and Penny Bee

everyone in Manchester measuring their levels of depression and collecting basic demographics such as age, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, accommodation and employment status. The first 11 people to return their questionnaires report their age (in years) as follows: 22, 49, 33, 41, 87, 18, 33, 54, 40, 33, 72 The mean is the average of all the data. We calculate this by adding up all the values in our list and then dividing by the number of values we have. In our example, the mean is (18+22+33+33+33+40+41+49+54+72+87) divided by 11 = 43.8. This means the average age for

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers