Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • "French resistance" x
  • Refine by access: User-accessible content x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Open Access (free)
Communities, circumstances and choices
Nicholas Atkin

leader of the French Resistance both inside and outside of France, although such status did not ensure the political settlement he craved. For that, he would have to wait until 1958. Aside from de Gaulle’s obvious political importance, memory has also played its part in the close identification of French exiles with the general. To explain why this is so in the case of the British, it is necessary to reflect on the extraordinary and unpropitious circumstances of June 1940. On his arrival, the general was an ‘unknown’ and received little publicity: his broadcast of 18

in The forgotten French
Open Access (free)
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

various victim groups of irredentist conflicts, anti-​Semitic persecution and repression against Resistance fighters to Nazi occupation have brought into play a vast palette of rituals that are not always primari­ly religious in character, but always eminently political, in a context in which the inscription of corpses within a framework of identity is crucial in justifying the region’s political and national affiliation. Similar issues are addressed in the chapter by Devlin M.  Scofield, which examines the transfer of the remains of eleven members of the French

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

later. Julie’s only son, Marcel Siesel, who was involved in the French Resistance, had been captured and executed by the Nazis during the war. hH Another German in Manchester, arriving by way of a different kind of history than my father’s, was the footballer Bert Trautmann. Rather fancifully, I like to think he may somehow have been connected with the artist Fritz Trautmann, born of German parents in Wisconsin, and a member of Kathleen McEnery’s circle in Rochester. Her fascinating portrait of him is in the Memorial Art Gallery there. But I have absolutely no

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
The discovery, commemoration and reinterment of eleven Alsatian victims of Nazi terror, 1947– 52
Devlin M. Scofield

 wake. Notes 1 See R. Bessel, Germany 1945: From War to Peace (New York: HarperCollins, 2009), especially ch. 3, ‘Murder and Mayhem’. 2 See S. Farmer, Martyred Village:  Commemorating the 1944 Massacre at Oradour-​sur-​Glane (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999). 3 The mass grave of the Alsatians was the second of its kind discovered in the area outside Rammersweier. In December 1945, the bodies of four Frenchwomen who had been executed as members of the French Resistance had been discovered in the neighbouring forest. The women had been killed at the same time

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Cas Mudde

the papers always devote a few condemnatory words to the Nazi regime and never openly endorse its politics, their description of the events and the classifications used often paint a rather favourable picture. For instance, in an article on the trial of war criminal Klaus Barbie, the author speaks on the one hand of the ‘terror’ and ‘murder gangs’ of the Maquis (the French resistance), and on the other hand of the ‘phenomenal abilities’ of Barbie, who allegedly has been put on the war criminal list ‘because of a thirst for revenge of the resistance’ (DNZ 5/87). No

in The ideology of the extreme right
Philip Cowley and Mark Stuart

warfare, 72 Philip Cowley and Mark Stuart with both their behaviour and their raison d’être likened by one of the group to that of the French resistance during the Second World War: When France was invaded it was finished. Then two and a half thousand out of 40 million joined the Maquis. We can’t defeat the Government in votes, we can’t defeat them in argument, since no one ever listens, but we can tie them down in the same way that the Maquis tied down the Germans . . . it’s only pot shots, but it’s a form of opposition.22 It would be carrying the military analogy

in The Conservatives in Crisis
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

‘vous’ (plural, or polite form – so not Eri to Leonie), it must be Leonie’s telegram to her family. Is it possible that this is my cousin, Marcel Siesel, who was in the French Resistance? Marcel was the son of Julie – my father’s cousin whom we visited in 1953 and who is standing behind me in that photograph. The same Julie who, I later found out, my cousin Marlyse lived with for a time in exile in Thionville. She was married to a doctor, Proper Siesel, and Marcel was their only child. I don’t know what Marcel’s activities were in the Resistance, but he is recorded as

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

, and whose lives I’d love to know more about. His father’s cousin Emma (sister of Julie, the mother of Marcel who died in the French Resistance) was single, and lived with her widowed sister, and her sister-in-law in her later years. It was with them that my cousin Marlyse lived, in France, as a young girl in the 1930s. Emma is on the right in this photograph from 1953 (and I am in front, with Julie’s hand on my shoulder). More mysterious, and a generation earlier, is Emma’s aunt Minette Levy (1845–1919), my father’s great-aunt, oldest of nine siblings, whose grave I

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

example, has discussed the tensions between official histories and their contestation in ‘popular’ or unofficial memory, analysing the bearing of historical and memorial knowledge on formations of identity and operations of power. In a discussion of ‘film and popular memory’ in French cinema of the 1970s (specifically, a number of films dealing with the French Resistance), Foucault suggests that memory is ‘a very important

in Memory and popular film